Quote Originally Posted by 71Bear View Post
The competition in the north is not between medical centers. It is between healthcare systems - Dignity, Sutter and KP and their affiliated and/or owned hospitals control the market. If you want to receive care at a particular group of clinics/hospitals, you choose the appropriate plan.
Now on their 7th location, and expanding big time in the East Bay....

FWIW, Anthem, Blue cross, Blue Shield PPO, Aetna, Cigna and U/H didn't get the message either since they contract with Stanford, UCLA, Cedars, UCI, Davis, etc. What is that, about 99% of the non-obamacare policies written in the State? Now that doesn't mean the Bay Area doesn't historically have larger hospital companies than in SoCal (the big dog is Socal is Providence btw), but to make an unsupported blanket statement that they "control" the market is just factually inaccurate. Here is the latest summary from the think tank California Health Care Foundation report dealing with all the regional submarkets that characterize the Bay Area market:


More Competition, More Choices for Consumers Expected

From the developments described above, it is clear that major Bay Area providers are taking very different approaches to expanding their presence throughout a very diversified and stratified region. While Sutter is largely trying to harness the power of its existing operations by consolidating and centralizing [this is fancy for closing hospitals], providers with smaller existing footprints — like UCSF and Muir — are pursuing regionalization primarily through strategic partnerships. Provider approaches to regionalization also reflect different underlying strategies: While Stanford’s approach appears targeted primarily toward winning business from high-margin, high-wage employers in the technology sector, Sutter and the BAACN partnership are pursuing more of a value-based population management strategy, seeking to develop regional networks that can deliver and manage care efficiently enough to compete vigorously with Kaiser in the commercial market. Most respondents expected the vast array of different providers’ growing regional reach to ramp up price competition and expand the range of insurance-product and provider-network choices available to consumers. This is likely to be particularly true in certain areas of the East Bay such as the Oakland/Berkeley submarket, where provider competition and available care networks have been limited to date.....