Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 25

Thread: OT: Cal's Online Courses No Longer Available to Public

  1. #1

    OT: Cal's Online Courses No Longer Available to Public

    The thrust of the linked article is that Cal's hundreds if not thousands of online courses will no longer be offered to the public because of the cost of meeting ADA standards that require access of course material to the deaf. The author a conservative intellectual writing in a conservative magazine, laments the loss. He writes :

    "Since 2012, UC Berkeley (among many other schools) has offered video and audio recordings of many of its courses to the general public, via YouTube and iTunes U. The Seussian acronym is MOOCs for massive open online courses. Over the years Berkeley's catalogue of MOOCs has grown to more than 40,000 hours of high-end pedagogy. There are introductory courses in economics, European history, statistics, physics, geography, and pretty much everything else. More advanced courses range from "Scientific Approaches to Consciousness" and "Game Theory" to "The Planets" and "Philosophy of Language," this last taught by John Searle, the country's, and maybe the world's, greatest living philosopher. Not all of the content will be to everyone's taste, of course, and I'm sure there's something to annoy anyone sooner or later. Professor Michael Nagler's simpering "Intro to Nonviolence" makes me want to punch something. I probably wouldn't like "Journalism for Social Change, either.

    But still, wandering around this digital edifice one can't help but marvel. Has the Internet ever seemed so close to fulfilling the promise of its salad days? Think of it: Anyone anywhere can take a class at UC Berkeley, at their own pace, without tests or note-taking or waking up before noon! And despite the reflexive slanders from conservatives and its well-earned reputation as a hive of left-wingers, Berkeley remains one of the great intellectual centers of the world when it's not being torched by its students. Clicking on a course that seems even vaguely interesting, a former liberal arts major will now and then feel a reawakening of the thrill and sense of elation and limitless possibility that are among the great rewards of brainy adventures. Berkeley's MOOCs constitute an expansion of intellectual opportunity unimaginable 25 years ago."

    Anyone care to comment?

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/berkel...rticle/2007153

  2. #2
    508 compliance is no joke. Very expensive to ensure all types of content are accessible. I'm sort of surprised that there isn't a more automatic internet technology solution to make this more automatic for internet users. Federal, state and local governments are required by law to meet these requirements. Seems like there is a market for having content be 508 accessible, but alas this is similar why tropical diseases are not cured. There is apparently no money in it.

  3. #3
    True Blue Golden Bear okaydo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Bearilinga, CA
    Posts
    21,898
    I was pretty sure that online courses started before 2012, and I was right:


  4. #4
    True Blue Golden Bear okaydo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Bearilinga, CA
    Posts
    21,898

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by santacruzbear View Post
    The thrust of the linked article is that Cal's hundreds if not thousands of online courses will no longer be offered to the public because of the cost of meeting ADA standards that require access of course material to the deaf. The author a conservative intellectual writing in a conservative magazine, laments the loss. He writes :

    "Since 2012, UC Berkeley (among many other schools) has offered video and audio recordings of many of its courses to the general public, via YouTube and iTunes U. The Seussian acronym is MOOCs for massive open online courses. Over the years Berkeley's catalogue of MOOCs has grown to more than 40,000 hours of high-end pedagogy. There are introductory courses in economics, European history, statistics, physics, geography, and pretty much everything else. More advanced courses range from "Scientific Approaches to Consciousness" and "Game Theory" to "The Planets" and "Philosophy of Language," this last taught by John Searle, the country's, and maybe the world's, greatest living philosopher. Not all of the content will be to everyone's taste, of course, and I'm sure there's something to annoy anyone sooner or later. Professor Michael Nagler's simpering "Intro to Nonviolence" makes me want to punch something. I probably wouldn't like "Journalism for Social Change, either.

    But still, wandering around this digital edifice one can't help but marvel. Has the Internet ever seemed so close to fulfilling the promise of its salad days? Think of it: Anyone anywhere can take a class at UC Berkeley, at their own pace, without tests or note-taking or waking up before noon! And despite the reflexive slanders from conservatives and its well-earned reputation as a hive of left-wingers, Berkeley remains one of the great intellectual centers of the world when it's not being torched by its students. Clicking on a course that seems even vaguely interesting, a former liberal arts major will now and then feel a reawakening of the thrill and sense of elation and limitless possibility that are among the great rewards of brainy adventures. Berkeley's MOOCs constitute an expansion of intellectual opportunity unimaginable 25 years ago."

    Anyone care to comment?

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/berkel...rticle/2007153
    I have many comments but will keep most to myself. I didn't know these existed but now I don't have access to them because one segment of the population didn't have access to them? Brilliant. I'm just wondering why they weren't pulled earlier. People who didn't have the ability to get on the internet didn't have access to them. Btw, John Searle was my favorite Prof at Cal. Very engaging style and obviously loved teaching.

  6. #6
    What a shame to lose this resource.

  7. #7
    Just wanted to thank you, santacruzbear, for mentioning John Searle. It made me google him and watch his Ted talk. Him raising his arm to illustrate a philosophical, consciousness point is an image I'll have forever. "...And the damn thing goes up."

  8. #8
    I can't blame this one on Trump.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by burritos View Post
    I can't blame this one on Trump.
    Who do we blame it on?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by hanky1 View Post
    Who do we blame it on?
    Andy Buh?

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by hanky1 View Post
    Who do we blame it on?
    I thought it was because of deaf people?

  12. #12
    Real Bear
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    East of Tomales Bay; west of Eagle Lake; south of Sauvie Island; north of Pismo Beach
    Posts
    2,033
    Quote Originally Posted by hanky1 View Post
    Who do we blame it on?
    Blame it on right wing extremism. Those who fear socialism, labor unions, socialized medicine, and progress. Bailed out capitalists.

    Read Viktor Frankl, logotherapy and the existential crisis -- guilt, suffering and death.
    Last edited by joe yaks; 03-14-2017 at 01:33 PM.

  13. #13
    True Blue Golden Bear okaydo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Bearilinga, CA
    Posts
    21,898
    Quote Originally Posted by hanky1 View Post
    Who do we blame it on?
    You said you didn't need her
    You told her good-bye (good-bye)
    You sacrificed a good love
    To satisfy your pride
    Now you wished
    That you should have her (have her)
    And you feel like such a fool
    You let her walk away
    Now it just don't feel the same
    Gotta blame it on something
    Gotta blame it on something

    Blame it on the rain (rain)
    Blame it on the stars (stars)
    Whatever you do don't put the blame on you
    Blame it on the rain yeah yeah
    You can blame it on the rain

    —Mark Twain

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by burritos View Post
    I thought it was because of deaf people?
    My initial reaction was to blame all the progressives who insist on providing these services to the disabled. It's a very noble sentiment, but when the cost becomes too extreme then programs get cut and everyone loses - abled and disabled.

  15. #15

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •