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Thread: OT: United Passengers dragged out of plane due to over bookings!

  1. #16
    United has got to be the worst airline in the US. Luckily Alaska is ramping up at SFO after their merger with Virgin and adding direct flights to pretty much all the tourist hotspots so there won't be any reason for me to ever fly them again. Yay!

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Bear19 View Post
    Worst case scenario: He ends up on the no fly list. What United did was 100% wrong - but on a plane, the Captain has absolute authority. If he/she tells you to deplane, that's what you have to do.
    Captain? This has nothing to do with the Captain.

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by calbear93 View Post
    I will say this, and let's please keep politics out of this. United Airlines were idiots. Since they overbooked, they should have kept increasing the compensation in an auction like fashion until they found the necessary volunteers who would leave the plane with a smile on their face. The amount of money they would have spent getting both sides happy would be nothing compared to the PR disaster they have inherited and the cost they will incur to try to fix what is a long-term damage. As a business without the benefit of a monopoly, don't over-regulate when you are dealing with customers or refer to some boilerplate fine print. Bad businesses should suffer, and poor managers should be punished with poor stock performance.
    Pretty much this. Entirely avoidable situation on so many levels. I would hope that someone at United corporate has reached out to the gentleman who was injured to perform some service recovery already and that they are updating their procedures to eliminate this type of situation from re-occurring. I don't think politics has anything to do with this.

    Separately, I do understand the argument that once the aviation police or whomever laid their hands on the guy, he should have stopped resisting but I would imagine a lot of people would want to continue to maintain their position and not acquiesce to what amounted to a use of force against someone who hadn't yet done anything wrong.

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Unit2Sucks View Post
    Pretty much this. Entirely avoidable situation on so many levels. I would hope that someone at United corporate has reached out to the gentleman who was injured to perform some service recovery already and that they are updating their procedures to eliminate this type of situation from re-occurring. I don't think politics has anything to do with this.

    Separately, I do understand the argument that once the aviation police or whomever laid their hands on the guy, he should have stopped resisting but I would imagine a lot of people would want to continue to maintain their position and not acquiesce to what amounted to a use of force against someone who hadn't yet done anything wrong.
    Why should he stop resisting? Seems he was well within his rights. United screwed up and the police screwed up.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by dajo9 View Post
    The statement is kind of hilarious - "when he fell", as if being forcibly moved had nothing to do with it.

    I had an experience recently with being bumped from a United flight for employee transit. I was at the gate when I was told I couldn't board. They gave me a check for $1,350 since it was involuntary and found me a flight for later in the day so I was pretty happy with the whole experience. Other experiences may vary.
    The federal rule is 4x your paid fare for over 2 hour delays and 2x the paid fare for under 2 hour delays. Airlines will try to offer less (often much less) to get people to volunteer. Of course it's usually flight credit and not cash back, so that requires on to fly the same airline again.

    I think there should a third tier for overnight delays, though - as that causes significantly more pain.

    I would also think the airline knows paid fare and chooses the 4 cheapest ones, so it's possible the check would have been for less than $1350.

  6. #21
    His rights? What rights? The right to life liberty and flying coach? It's mind boggling that there are so many people who seem to honestly think he had a "right" to remain on the plane against the owner's wishes. Our entitlement society is totally fucked.

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by OldBlue1999 View Post
    His rights? What rights? The right to life liberty and flying coach? It's mind boggling that there are so many people who seem to honestly think he had a "right" to remain on the plane against the owner's wishes. Our entitlement society is totally fucked.
    I don't think it's as cut and dry as that. Consumers do have protections - I personally wouldn't use the word rights, but that word means different things to different people. In any case, I think legally United is fine, however from a customer service and image standpoint they are going to take a massive hit.

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastabear View Post
    I have over a million actual miles on United and have been flying with them since people puffed happily on their cigarerettes throughout 11 hour flights and long before there were such things as frequent flyer programs. When I first flew wth them the planes were regularly half empty or more. I remember taking one notable trip on a 767 to New York from San Francisco where I was one of three passengers on the plane (we got lots of attention).

    Starting 20 years or so ago United (and the other airlines) figured they were wasting lots of money by flying with empty seats. Since their costs were almost entirely fixed any revenue they could get for a ticket would improve the bottom line. They started using computer programs to overbook flights and then "dealing" with the consequences (usually through paying people to get off the flight) if too many folks showed up.

    Voila. No more empty seats on planes - ever. I actually can't recall the last time I got on a United flight that was not 100% full. Every crappy middle seat, every non- reclining seat stuck next to the bathroom 100% full 100% of the time. Good for the bottom line yes. Good for customers no.

    The issue is that United has now taken their revenue enhancing model of occupying seats as a God given right. They WON'T fly planes with empty seats. They'll just cancel the flight and rebook everyone on the next flight. So what if that's a huge inconvenience to their customers? It squeezes out more revenue and that is what matters.

    Bottom line, this incident is the logical culmination of this mindset. Jack booted thugs dragging paying customers off of planes. I'm beyond disgusted. I'm done with United. I'll take my business elsewhere.
    Good info. Not that I fly United but good to know.

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by OldBlue1999 View Post
    His rights? What rights? The right to life liberty and flying coach? It's mind boggling that there are so many people who seem to honestly think he had a "right" to remain on the plane against the owner's wishes. Our entitlement society is totally fucked.
    I dont know if he felt entitled though if his story ends up checking out. Supposedly he's a doctor and he had patients to see the next day. It could be where he actually wasn't thinking about himself.

    United could have just kept upping the offer until someone took it. Eventually I think someone would have, everyone has a price.

  10. #25
    Pretty stupid response if he is a doctor. When they ask up to leave, leave.

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by dajo9 View Post
    I don't think it's as cut and dry as that. Consumers do have protections - I personally wouldn't use the word rights, but that word means different things to different people. In any case, I think legally United is fine, however from a customer service and image standpoint they are going to take a massive hit.
    His consumer protections don't include physically resisting a request (or if came from a police offer, lawful order) to leave the plane. That is cut and dry - if you're asked to leave, you need to leave. United can revoke his ticket at any time, though there are consumer protection/contractual penalties they have to deal with. And in this case, he was 1 of 4 people asked to leave - the other 3 complied. And after he was removed from the flight, he fought his way back on which made the situation worse and goes a long way to showing the guys MO.

    Based on what is known, I think you're correct that United and/or the police handled this poorly. But it seems equally clear the guy was operating from a misplaced sense of entitlement/self importance.

  12. #27
    You will comply. Resistance is Futile. 7 of 9 knows best

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by BearGoggles View Post
    His consumer protections don't include physically resisting a request (or if came from a police offer, lawful order) to leave the plane. That is cut and dry - if you're asked to leave, you need to leave. United can revoke his ticket at any time, though there are consumer protection/contractual penalties they have to deal with. And in this case, he was 1 of 4 people asked to leave - the other 3 complied. And after he was removed from the flight, he fought his way back on which made the situation worse and goes a long way to showing the guys MO.

    Based on what is known, I think you're correct that United and/or the police handled this poorly. But it seems equally clear the guy was operating from a misplaced sense of entitlement/self importance.
    Like I said, legally United is fine.

    What is clear is that you can't not attack me. Don't have the willpower to resist. I guess I've gotten in your head.

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by oskidunker View Post
    You will comply. Resistance is Futile. 7 of 9 knows best
    well i mean in today's society, its crazy to resist the police. personally I would have taken the $800 and called it a win for the day.

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by gobears725 View Post
    I dont know if he felt entitled though if his story ends up checking out. Supposedly he's a doctor and he had patients to see the next day. It could be where he actually wasn't thinking about himself.

    United could have just kept upping the offer until someone took it. Eventually I think someone would have, everyone has a price.
    At this point, I'd imagine the "volunteered" passenger (or his lawyer, to be exact), has a price in mind.




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