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Thread: OT: United Passengers dragged out of plane due to over bookings!

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by calbear93 View Post
    Since they overbooked, they should have kept increasing the compensation in an auction like fashion until they found the necessary volunteers who would leave the plane with a smile on their face. The amount of money they would have spent getting both sides happy would be nothing compared to the PR disaster.
    This. Don't board anyone until the problem is solved. PR 101 for common carriers.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by OBear073akaSMFan View Post
    Why the heck would United do this, especially since the seats would be given up for other United employees and they were the ones that overbooked. Put those employees on a competitor airline. Totally bad publicity for this airline. I can see lawsuits soon. Sorry if this is a booth.

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/united-pa...134930951.html
    The first mistake was booking United Airlines. After my last experience with them, we will never use them again. We pulled out LAX, had to go back near a terminal while they spent hours rebalancing private cargo they were being paid to ship, told after passengers demanded to be be taken back to the terminal, that anyone leaving would be left behind and have to rebook, and we would have to wait an extra hour while their luggage was removed (that stopped that passenger demand), missed the connection to our Caribbean flight so we lost a vacation day, stayed over night in the roach motel, literally right on a runway in Miami airport. And the trip coming back was worse (ten hours in a terminal because our flight back to LA was cancelled). Use United at your peril.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by dajo9 View Post
    Like I said, legally United is fine.

    What is clear is that you can't not attack me. Don't have the willpower to resist. I guess I've gotten in your head.
    And I attacked you how? By agreeing with you in part? If you're lucky enough to be in my head, that's a good thing - you might learn something.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by BearGoggles View Post
    His consumer protections don't include physically resisting a request (or if came from a police offer, lawful order) to leave the plane. That is cut and dry - if you're asked to leave, you need to leave. United can revoke his ticket at any time, though there are consumer protection/contractual penalties they have to deal with. And in this case, he was 1 of 4 people asked to leave - the other 3 complied. And after he was removed from the flight, he fought his way back on which made the situation worse and goes a long way to showing the guys MO.

    Based on what is known, I think you're correct that United and/or the police handled this poorly. But it seems equally clear the guy was operating from a misplaced sense of entitlement/self importance.
    Wait, what? If I'm on that flight ..... I'd probably punch him too. So now he's not only disobeying flight crew orders, he's disobeying law enforcement.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by oskidunker View Post
    You will comply. Resistance is Futile. 7 of 9 knows best
    yes .... yes she does ....


  6. #36
    What I haven't read in any of the stories is why those four (4) United crew needed those seats on an overbooked flight. Were they employees on standby simply trying to get a free flight as an employee, or did they have a purpose in "needing" to be on the flight (or getting to the destination).

    I think that hugely impacts United's "blame" on this. If those four United crew who were on standby were simply trying to get a free flight to the destination, United f*ed up even more by placing their employees' rights above paying passengers. This would be an even greater PR nightmare, much more so than it already is.

    Can anyone clarify?

  7. #37
    Let me guess, no first class passenger was ever in jeopardy of getting bumped

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by travelingbears View Post
    What I haven't read in any of the stories is why those four (4) United crew needed those seats on an overbooked flight. Were they employees on standby simply trying to get a free flight as an employee, or did they have a purpose in "needing" to be on the flight (or getting to the destination).

    I think that hugely impacts United's "blame" on this. If those four United crew who were on standby were simply trying to get a free flight to the destination, United f*ed up even more by placing their employees' rights above paying passengers. This would be an even greater PR nightmare, much more so than it already is.

    Can anyone clarify?
    They were on stand by to get to a flight they were scheduled to work the next day (today) in Louisville, is what I read.

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by travelingbears View Post
    What I haven't read in any of the stories is why those four (4) United crew needed those seats on an overbooked flight. Were they employees on standby simply trying to get a free flight as an employee, or did they have a purpose in "needing" to be on the flight (or getting to the destination).

    I think that hugely impacts United's "blame" on this. If those four United crew who were on standby were simply trying to get a free flight to the destination, United f*ed up even more by placing their employees' rights above paying passengers. This would be an even greater PR nightmare, much more so than it already is.

    Can anyone clarify?
    I think they were being transported to work a different flight. It was not a free flight for personal reasons, but it was still putting the company business before customer service.

    I don't understand the debate on who has the legal right. If they need to rely on lawyer's interpretation of boilerplate language or to differentiate renting a seat versus purchasing the right to be on the flight, then they have already lost. The boilerplate language is meant to protect against potential lawsuit and not to justify poor customer service (not that the boilerplate language is going to be easy to enforce anyway when the leverage is so one-sided and most people don't read it). I doubt they are going to advertise that people should fly United because they have the tightest boilerplate provision in a questionable contract that allows them to screw the customer.

    The problem with the bigger airlines is that they are still stuck in the bureaucratic system of dehumanizing customers, employees, etc. Anyone who has been to the DMV understands that, when you make someone not accountable for customer service, whether through proper compensation incentives, review, etc., then you will end up with crappy service. At least the government can get away with this because there are no options. But large airlines that cannot connect goodwill and brand development with the employees who influence customer experience will continue to go bankrupt despite any algorithm maximizing capacity and despite any claim that their customers fly the friendly skies. For the most part, JetBlue, Southwest and Alaska Airlines understand this even though they deal with the same overbooking and weather issues. When they develop goodwill (whether through providing free luggage check-in, free wifi, personable flight attendants, etc.) and when they have adequate crisis management plan to promptly address situations like this (don't use euphemisms that are not going to really make people think it is something better than it really is, don't blame the customer, etc.), they can get away with incidents like this. Even American (which has been horrible in the past) and Delta are beginning to get this and are trying to provide more accommodations that are cheaper than advertisement (whether free entertainment or free food). United keeps kicking itself (whether it's the guitar issue or this - why would anyone fly with them unless they were materially cheaper - and wouldn't it be a better business model not to have to be the cheapest when your costs are not the lowest?).
    Last edited by calbear93; 04-10-2017 at 02:00 PM.

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by tommie317 View Post
    Let me guess, no first class passenger was ever in jeopardy of getting bumped
    Nor any customer with elite status. They target non-elite customers with the cheapest fare without connecting flights.
    Last edited by calbear93; 04-10-2017 at 02:00 PM.

  11. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by BearGoggles View Post
    His consumer protections don't include physically resisting a request (or if came from a police offer, lawful order) to leave the plane. That is cut and dry - if you're asked to leave, you need to leave. United can revoke his ticket at any time, though there are consumer protection/contractual penalties they have to deal with. And in this case, he was 1 of 4 people asked to leave - the other 3 complied. And after he was removed from the flight, he fought his way back on which made the situation worse and goes a long way to showing the guys MO.

    Based on what is known, I think you're correct that United and/or the police handled this poorly. But it seems equally clear the guy was operating from a misplaced sense of entitlement/self importance.
    He was clearly dazed & confused when he reboarded the plane-- I'm thinking post-concussive symptoms. I doubt he possessed his full faculties at that point.

  12. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by calbear93 View Post
    Nor any customer with elite status. They target non-elite customers with the cheapest fair without connecting flights.
    Yup...nothing "random" with how they select who gets bloodied and dragged out of the plane.

  13. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by oskidunker View Post
    Pretty stupid response if he is a doctor. When they ask up to leave, leave.
    He was a doctor (and his wife) who was arbitrarily selected notwithstanding he told the airline authorities he had to be back for patients the next morning. I can see why he had concerns. I guess in the old days they just would have picked the black guy.
    Last edited by wifeisafurd; 04-10-2017 at 02:29 PM.

  14. #44
    FWIW, the police officers have been suspended and the Chicago Police say they violated policy. I do whatever men with guns say, but that doesn't distract from the fact this carrier has some real customer relations issues.

  15. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by wifeisafurd View Post
    He was a doctor (and his wife) who was arbitrarily selected notwithstanding he told the airline authorities he had to be back for patients the next morning. I can see why he had concerns. I guess in the old days they just would have picked the black guy.
    Nowadays, it's pick the Asian guy, they usually go more quietly (Note: I'm Asian, but it's actually pretty common)

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