Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: OT: How Colleges Are Making Libraries Relevant, Get Rid Of Books

  1. #1

    OT: How Colleges Are Making Libraries Relevant, Get Rid Of Books

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/l...419-story.html


    “I’ve never actually needed to use a physical book,” Xiao said. “I’ve never checked one out. I can’t honestly say I even know how.”


    "At UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, students led a successful charge to get rid of books. They gained traction by invoking one of the school’s mantras: question the status quo. Hilary Schiraldi, the business school librarian, said students kept asking her, “In the spirit of challenging the status quo, why is this library filled with dusty books no one looks at and I can’t get a study space?"
    Last edited by socaliganbear; 04-19-2017 at 12:57 PM.

  2. #2
    Maybe the library of the future is a bunch of chairs with charging stations, so people can sit down, charge their devices and google sh!t. A "top-notch" library would have more and fancier of the above.

  3. #3
    I've thought for a long time that it's a waste of a city's money to build a big library and fill it with books.
    Build a smaller, nicer one with functional equipment (e.g. Computers, etc), collaboration and study spaces. Oh, and a nice cafe or I will just go to the coffee shop to study anyway
    I dont need easy, I need possible. Jorge Gutierrez

  4. #4
    Maybe they could take all the books and store them in a more space-efficient way but still have them accessible through a robot book picker. I think I only had one class in college that caused me to look at books in the library (a history class) but I wasn't a humanities major either.

    I don't think anyone is building new libraries (other than presidential ones every 4 or 8 years) so for the most part it's just a question of whether we repurpose existing ones in the age of the kindle.

  5. #5
    There are libraries and there are libraries. For academic libraries, the challenge is how to serve the research needs of students and faculty. Student use of academic nonfiction books is definitely going out of style and that includes e-books as well as print (ask any academic library for its circulation records minus its reserve materials circulation for evidence). How this trend affects the resultant research done by students is a question for later. The drive to use only journal research has been going on for decades but it has accelerated lately due to the ease of the library's purchased databases as well as the obvious use of the internet. Whether the book format survives as a student research tool is definitely up for debate. One possible change in the book format would be to journalize the book, or deconstruct it into a journal type database.

    For public libraries, the name of the game is to become community centers with lots of non-library activities, some of which would have been done by recreation or adult education departments in the past. Examples include Makerspaces and computer instruction. Public libraries are thriving due to this additional focus or added mission.

    Go Bears

  6. #6
    I teach in graduate school, so it's similar but not exactly the same. Our students generally don't buy many of the books that we "require". Most find ways of getting electronic copies, but there's still a large percent that may not have either hard or soft copies. This is a problem when the books are integrated into the curriculum, unfortunately, the mindset of many students is that it's the teachers' responsibility to make sure that the students get the information in other ways...Maybe I'm just too old school as I like the physical textbook as a reference. Unfortunately, many of our students never have the same feeling or appreciation as the majority of their reference material has been electronic for most of their education...

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by PTBear View Post
    I teach in graduate school, so it's similar but not exactly the same. Our students generally don't buy many of the books that we "require". Most find ways of getting electronic copies, but there's still a large percent that may not have either hard or soft copies. This is a problem when the books are integrated into the curriculum, unfortunately, the mindset of many students is that it's the teachers' responsibility to make sure that the students get the information in other ways...Maybe I'm just too old school as I like the physical textbook as a reference. Unfortunately, many of our students never have the same feeling or appreciation as the majority of their reference material has been electronic for most of their education...
    I agree with your students. In grad school, I did everything possible to avoid actually buying textbooks. Of course, that doesn't mean I didn't appreciate books in general. I don't use a kindle for personal reading and will always buy a physical book.

  8. #8
    This is the last straw for this old bibliophile. I once worked in the Moffitt Library hauling books to and from the 18 branch libraries on the campus. It was a great job and allowed me a pass to the stacks of books inside (in those days undergrads had no such access). I have more than 8,000 books in my house including a library in one the rooms. I guess soon I may have more volumes in my home than some colleges will have. .

  9. #9
    a huge problem is the huge size and huge cost of text books
    lugging around a few books in a backpack is back breaking, plus now you need a laptop
    i can not understand why all text books aren't available as ebooks


    Quote Originally Posted by PTBear View Post
    I teach in graduate school, so it's similar but not exactly the same. Our students generally don't buy many of the books that we "require". Most find ways of getting electronic copies, but there's still a large percent that may not have either hard or soft copies. This is a problem when the books are integrated into the curriculum, unfortunately, the mindset of many students is that it's the teachers' responsibility to make sure that the students get the information in other ways...Maybe I'm just too old school as I like the physical textbook as a reference. Unfortunately, many of our students never have the same feeling or appreciation as the majority of their reference material has been electronic for most of their education...
    I dont need easy, I need possible. Jorge Gutierrez

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Unit2Sucks View Post
    Maybe they could take all the books and store them in a more space-efficient way but still have them accessible through a robot book picker. I think I only had one class in college that caused me to look at books in the library (a history class) but I wasn't a humanities major either.

    I don't think anyone is building new libraries (other than presidential ones every 4 or 8 years) so for the most part it's just a question of whether we repurpose existing ones in the age of the kindle.
    And of course those don't have books, per SW, either.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by socaliganbear View Post
    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/l...419-story.html


    Ive never actually needed to use a physical book, Xiao said. Ive never checked one out. I cant honestly say I even know how.


    "At UC Berkeleys Haas School of Business, students led a successful charge to get rid of books. They gained traction by invoking one of the schools mantras: question the status quo. Hilary Schiraldi, the business school librarian, said students kept asking her, In the spirit of challenging the status quo, why is this library filled with dusty books no one looks at and I cant get a study space?"
    For the sake of "challenging the status quo" ...why does a person need a place to study. If books are no longer required and if the Internet provides all books on line, why can't that person do all studying in her/his dorm or apartment?

  12. #12

  13. #13
    There are lots of reasons students give for using the library to study instead of where they are living. In fact, the biggest use of academic libraries is for studying. Group studying, use of computers (not all students have sole access to computers or a printer at home), use of specialized software or hardware, quiet space, safety (yep, libraries are the best safe spaces for some). Then, there are the non academic reasons, hanging out, etc.

    Go Bears

  14. #14
    One receives and processed information in entirely different way reading. For one, you discover information in a book rather than searching for what you know or wanting to know. And many studies show that reading and writing on physical paper leads to much higher retention and original thought. But those kids on their smart phones know better, right?
    ~The Bear will not quilt. The Bear will not dye.~



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •