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Thread: The Big Sleep

  1. #1

    The Big Sleep

    Raymond Chandler.
    1939.

    Somehow I've never managed to read any of the Marlowe books, or James Cain of Dash Hammet's books either.

    Usually my books are for the time I spend waiting and traveling on my bus commutes each day -- especially since changes in AC Transit service ended the direct route from my home to Northgate, and now I have to make a connection each day. But once I started reading about Marlowe and his involvement with the Sternwood family, I read the book with every available moment, not just while on the bus.

    God, Chandler has an amazing skill at writing, and as every English student who has been assigned this book knows -- his use of metaphors and imagery is just incredible. My favorite:

    "There was no fear in the scream. It had a sound of half-pleasurable shock, an accent of drunkenness, an overtone of pure idiocy. It was a nasty sound. It made me think of white and barred windows and hard narrow cots with leather wrist and ankle straps fastened to them."

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheAdvisingBear View Post
    Raymond Chandler.
    1939.

    Somehow I've never managed to read any of the Marlowe books, or James Cain of Dash Hammet's books either.

    Usually my books are for the time I spend waiting and traveling on my bus commutes each day -- especially since changes in AC Transit service ended the direct route from my home to Northgate, and now I have to make a connection each day. But once I started reading about Marlowe and his involvement with the Sternwood family, I read the book with every available moment, not just while on the bus.

    God, Chandler has an amazing skill at writing, and as every English student who has been assigned this book knows -- his use of metaphors and imagery is just incredible. My favorite:

    "There was no fear in the scream. It had a sound of half-pleasurable shock, an accent of drunkenness, an overtone of pure idiocy. It was a nasty sound. It made me think of white and barred windows and hard narrow cots with leather wrist and ankle straps fastened to them."
    Read all of Chandler's novels some years ago. About time to start a re-read. His imagery of Los Angeles and its environs is remarkable. Makes you wish you had grown up there in 1930's so you could have experienced it that way. I believe the LA Times did a piece sometime in the 1990's locating the scenes in Chandler's books. Bay City was Long Beach.

  3. #3
    Interesting thread.Thanks a lot for sharing

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