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  (#16) Old
bluesaxe bluesaxe is online now
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12-24-2012, 07:44 AM

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Originally Posted by SFCityBear View Post
I agree that having to guard a dominant big man would hinder your ability to block shots in the paint. Aside from our three losses, Solomon has not had to guard very dominant big men. And Solomon is not always guarding the other team’s best post player, because some of the time we are playing zone. We are playing more zone this year, because in earlier games, our defense wasn’t able to stop big men in the paint, and wasn’t able to stop penetration into the paint.

Is this really true, that Montgomery “worked on him (Solomon)….to use his size, and not look to block shots”? It sounds out of character for Montgomery, to not utilize the talents that a player already has, and put him in position to make plays using those skills. That is Monty’s long time philosophy.

Solomon is our best shot blocker, although not the most effective, because he does not control the ball with the block like Kravish does. Did you see the play yesterday, where Kravish blocked a shot, grabbed the ball, and passed way down the floor to a teammate who finished a fast break? It was a good Bill Russell imitation. Even Thurman is learning to control the ball with the block, and had a nice block yesterday, where he got possession of the ball.
A true shot blocker is a nice thing to have on defense, but shot blocking sure isn't a measure of defensive capability. Devon Hardin was a worse defender than he should have been because of his propensity to try and block everything, which put him out of position on rebounds and left him vulnerable to pump fakes. So Solomon not blocking as many shots is not any kind of big deal to me. Solomon keeping strong defensive position and getting a body on his man while rebounding is way more important to me. That's a tradeoff I make every time.
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  (#17) Old
bluesaxe bluesaxe is online now
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12-24-2012, 07:55 AM

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Originally Posted by SFCityBear View Post
I agree with all you wrote. Solomon has a lot on his plate. He is being asked to guard the best post, rebound, stop the other team from getting so many offensive rebounds, protect the paint. Offensively, he is being asked to score now, and to finish around the basket, without losing the ball. He is probably concerned about missing free throws. And he is being asked to watch his fouls and his emotions, to keep himself on the floor.

Asking him to block a lot of shots would be too much. He only plays barely half a game now, but I don’t think it is too much to get one or two blocks a game. He should be able to do that without sacrificing much of his other responsibilities. It is not a thing you plan to do. It is just choosing the best opportunity for blocking a shot and reacting to it, and let the other shots go.
Why do you care so much about blocked shots? Better to secure the rebound, and better to focus on keeping your man outside is offensive comfort zone than to leave your feet. The problem with shot blockers is, outside of a very few extremely good ones, they miss on more attempts than they get. That's not a good thing for the most part.
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SFCityBear SFCityBear is offline
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12-24-2012, 01:08 PM

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Originally Posted by bluesaxe View Post
Why do you care so much about blocked shots? Better to secure the rebound, and better to focus on keeping your man outside is offensive comfort zone than to leave your feet. The problem with shot blockers is, outside of a very few extremely good ones, they miss on more attempts than they get. That's not a good thing for the most part.
I could not agree more with everything you’ve said in these last two posts.

I like shot blocks by a center in the paint, because one or two early ones can change an entire game, and make the offense change what they want to do. You must have seen the Cal – South Florida game in the NCAA last year. South Florida had two early shot blocks in the paint, one of which was by their big center Augustus Gilchrist. All year long Cal’s guards had their way with opposing bigs in the paint, taking it strong to the basket. Once USF made those blocks, Cal’s guards got hesitant about driving, and when they did drive, they had to alter their shots in the paint, probably fearing the shot block, and they missed shot after shot.

I also like shot blocks, because if you can control the ball, and get the fast break started, you are a step ahead of the opponent. Bill Russell made a living with the block, and the ensuing fast break. This is a luxury in college ball, and should not be attempted by a team or a player, until they have mastered sound defensive fundamentals. The primary reason for a shot block is to put some fear into guards driving into the paint, or if you are playing a big who is a scorer, block one, and make him think about you next time.

Whether or not we ask a player to block shots depends on the player’s defensive skills. I don’t consider Solomon as weak on defense as Devon Hardin, but many here do consider him a weak defender. If that is true, then he should be doing as you say, concentrate on his man defense first, before attempting shot blocks. He is averaging a block every other game. I don’t think it is a big stretch to double his output to one a game. I would like to see him try for a couple early ones, to make an impression, like Gilchrist did on us, and even if he didn’t get any, then settle down and play a tight man-to-man defense the rest of the game, with few or no attempts at blocks.
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  (#19) Old
SFCityBear SFCityBear is offline
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12-24-2012, 09:30 PM

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Originally Posted by socaltownie View Post
Not defensively. Kamp usually played the main post threat. Solo (until suspended) and Kravish played the other post player and provided weak side help on the rotation. That is the position that usually gets blocks because you are coming over to swat a guy penetrating. The strong side post defender STAYS with his man for as long as possible to both deny the drop off and establish position for the rebound.

Seriously, these criticisms based upon stat sheets are getting old and tiresome. I could care less about solo's blocks. What I want to see is him shut down post threats. So far so so. UCLA will be his next big test.

Unique and original theory, as usual, but untrue. In our man defense last year, Kravish guarded the opponent’s center, the 5, and Kamp guarded the Power Forward, or 4, in every game I can remember. The center, or the 5, was often the “main post threat”, and Kravish guarded him. Kravish is longer, an inch taller, and has much longer arms than Kamp. It makes absolutely no sense whatever to have your shorter big play the opponent’s longer big, and have your longer big play defense against the opponent’s shorter big, unless, for example, your longer big, is a stiff on defense, and the opponent’s center is their main post threat. Kravish is no stiff on defense. In fact, I would argue that he was a better defender than Kamp in some of last year’s games.

A few games that stick out in my mind from 2011-2012:

Stanford: In three games with Stanford, Kravish guarded Josh Owens, Stanford’s center and biggest threat in the post, and held him down. In games 2 and 3, Kamp guarded Zimmerman, who torched Kamp for the two best games of his career.

Utah: Kravish guarded Jason Washburn, the Utah center, who was their main and only post threat.

Oregon: Kravish primarily guarded Tony Woods, the Oregon center, and Kamp primarily took the shorter Singler, but Kravish sometimes switched out onto Singler.

UCLA: Kravish guarded the much bigger Josh Smith, UCLA’s main post threat, and cleaned his clock in two games. Kamp took David Wear.

South Florida: Kravish took Augustus Gilchrist, the USF center, and Kamp took the shorter Victor Rudd, and they did not do a good job on either one of them.

I could go on. There is some game video on the web, where you can see some of this.

I know you don’t like facts and stats, because that is evident from your posts, and I can see where they are tiresome for you. However, you make some of the wildest statements, based on what you think you saw in a game, or your overwhelming affection for a player, making you blind to his faults, or your contempt for a coach or player, making you blind to his virtues. My memory is not always so good these days, and it takes me hours to research the facts to make sure I feel I am correct before I respond to you. That is tiresome for me.

You are a good Cal fan, but in the spirit of Christmas, I think we should agree to end this relationship. I will give you the last word on this and any other post. I will not read or respond to any more of your posts. It is not worth my time, and our discussion must be boring everyone else to tears. To them, I apologize, and to you and everyone on the BI, may you all have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, filled with Cal Bear victories.

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6956bear 6956bear is offline
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12-25-2012, 03:05 AM

Agree 100%. Most shot blocks come from secondary defenders or on drives. Soloman is generally in foul trouble and much of that is from leaving his feet or reaching. His lack of strength is hurting him against true post players as he has difficulty holding his ground, but he is better off defending strong rather than leaving his feet to try and swat every shot.

It is difficult to defensive rebound when you leave your feet so often. He needs to hold his ground, seal his man and go get the ball. Richard needs to play 25+ minutes a night and too often he sits with foul trouble. Cal is not deep enough to afford him sitting that much, so he needs to avoid the silly fouls that come from leaving your feet needlessly or reaching.
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south bender south bender is offline
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12-25-2012, 04:29 AM

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Originally Posted by 6956bear View Post
Agree 100%. Most shot blocks come from secondary defenders or on drives. Soloman is generally in foul trouble and much of that is from leaving his feet or reaching. His lack of strength is hurting him against true post players as he has difficulty holding his ground, but he is better off defending strong rather than leaving his feet to try and swat every shot.

It is difficult to defensive rebound when you leave your feet so often. He needs to hold his ground, seal his man and go get the ball. Richard needs to play 25+ minutes a night and too often he sits with foul trouble. Cal is not deep enough to afford him sitting that much, so he needs to avoid the silly fouls that come from leaving your feet needlessly or reaching.
Not sure you are saying this, but if you are claiming that shot blocking is at the expense of defensive rebounding, then how do you explain Bill Russell's game? Or for that matter Roberson of Colorado, who excels at both?

I do agree that Richard needs first to stay out of foul trouble and to hold defensive position.

Go Bears!
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  (#22) Old
socaltownie socaltownie is offline
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12-25-2012, 07:11 PM

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Originally Posted by SFCityBear View Post
Unique and original theory, as usual, but untrue. In our man defense last year, Kravish guarded the opponent’s center, the 5, and Kamp guarded the Power Forward, or 4, in every game I can remember. The center, or the 5, was often the “main post threat”, and Kravish guarded him. Kravish is longer, an inch taller, and has much longer arms than Kamp. It makes absolutely no sense whatever to have your shorter big play the opponent’s longer big, and have your longer big play defense against the opponent’s shorter big, unless, for example, your longer big, is a stiff on defense, and the opponent’s center is their main post threat. Kravish is no stiff on defense. In fact, I would argue that he was a better defender than Kamp in some of last year’s games.

A few games that stick out in my mind from 2011-2012:

Stanford: In three games with Stanford, Kravish guarded Josh Owens, Stanford’s center and biggest threat in the post, and held him down. In games 2 and 3, Kamp guarded Zimmerman, who torched Kamp for the two best games of his career.

Utah: Kravish guarded Jason Washburn, the Utah center, who was their main and only post threat.

Oregon: Kravish primarily guarded Tony Woods, the Oregon center, and Kamp primarily took the shorter Singler, but Kravish sometimes switched out onto Singler.

UCLA: Kravish guarded the much bigger Josh Smith, UCLA’s main post threat, and cleaned his clock in two games. Kamp took David Wear.

South Florida: Kravish took Augustus Gilchrist, the USF center, and Kamp took the shorter Victor Rudd, and they did not do a good job on either one of them.

I could go on. There is some game video on the web, where you can see some of this.

I know you don’t like facts and stats, because that is evident from your posts, and I can see where they are tiresome for you. However, you make some of the wildest statements, based on what you think you saw in a game, or your overwhelming affection for a player, making you blind to his faults, or your contempt for a coach or player, making you blind to his virtues. My memory is not always so good these days, and it takes me hours to research the facts to make sure I feel I am correct before I respond to you. That is tiresome for me.

You are a good Cal fan, but in the spirit of Christmas, I think we should agree to end this relationship. I will give you the last word on this and any other post. I will not read or respond to any more of your posts. It is not worth my time, and our discussion must be boring everyone else to tears. To them, I apologize, and to you and everyone on the BI, may you all have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, filled with Cal Bear victories.

Oh come now. The idea that David was drawing the main assignment for guarding any true 5 or 4.5 is just hogwash. He was under 200 pounds for most of the season - possibly under 190 at points. Harper had at least 20-30 pounds on him and was giving up, at best 2 inches. Of COURSE Harper was guarding the main post threat. I will go look at the UCLA game because I find the idea that David was on Josh Smith kinda beyond humerous - of course the other thing is that Smith likely had limited minutes because of fouls.

I see you left out Zona, CU, WSU, and Washington, the teams that actually HAD post threats.
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