Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 28 of 28

Thread: OT: Today is the 75th anniversary of the Doolittle Raid

  1. #16
    It was an amazing operation and Doolittle was a true American hero. I was happy to hear that the next Air Force Bomber, the B-21 Raider, is named in honor of the operation.

  2. #17
    Absolutely... Those of us who were born and raised in Alameda were taught about his exploits early and often in our school "careers"....

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by okaydo View Post
    There is only one Doolittle Raider still alive -- Richard Cole was born in 1915.

    http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2017/...6341492524671/

    http://www.doolittleraider.com/raiders/cole.htm

  4. #19
    Golden Bear mbBear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Bala Cynwyd, Pa. (near Philly)
    Posts
    5,649
    Quote Originally Posted by okaydo View Post
    UC Berkeley alum Jimmy Doolittle led the first bombing of Tokyo on April 18, 1942 -- a mere 4 months after Pearl Harbor.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doolittle_Raid

    Is there anything on campus that has Doolittle's name on it?

  5. #20
    Little known fact: In the movie Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo, the bombing raid as filmed was actually "Thirty Seconds over Oakland." The bombing run clearly shows them (Van Johnson) flying over Yerba Buena Island, then going up the estuary and by the old PG&E gas holder tank that was just north of what is now the Oakland Coliseum....

  6. #21
    Loyal Bear
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Mt. Shasta, CA
    Posts
    3,781
    Gen. William F. Dean - Another famous military man who was an alum of Cal and its Army ROTC Program as well as being a Medal of Honor recipient. I was honored to have him pin my 2nd Lt bars on back in 1965.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_F._Dean

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by 93gobears View Post
    Just dropped in to the USS Hornet, at the old Alameda NAS. It's a wonderful museum. Any flight fanatics should check it out.
    Good museum, but not the same one as the Doolittle raid...that one was destroyed.

  8. #23
    Loyal Bear RichyBear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    San Leandro, California
    Posts
    3,833
    Cal honored Jimmy Doolittle during halftime at a football game in 1962. (I might be a year off.)

  9. #24
    Real Bear Number 031343's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    North of the Golden Gate Bridge
    Posts
    603
    Add, alumnus General Oliver P. Smith, USMC, who led the First Marine Division in the battle of the Chosin Reservoir, during the early months of the Korean War. Smith was ordered to advance his division toward the Chinese border by MacArthur. He carefully planned supply dumps and landing strips en route in case he had to reinforce or retreat. He was forced to retreat when numerically overwhelmed by Chinese attacks from several directions. His carefully planned retreat saved the division, one of the epics of that war.

    There was also a Navy Lieutenant commanding a small flight of Grumman Avengers from Midway Island in 1942, the first appearance of that aircraft in WWII. I Believe it may have been Langdon Fieberling, who graduated from Cal in the late 1930's. He was lost in the battle.

  10. #25
    The strike group will be in position soon enough.

    I'm not familiar with the Hornet museum. Please forgive my ignorance, but is the carrier itself there, or is there a building housing the displays?

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by TomBear View Post
    The strike group will be in position soon enough.

    I'm not familiar with the Hornet museum. Please forgive my ignorance, but is the carrier itself there, or is there a building housing the displays?
    The carrier is there and houses some displays inside. Not as nice as the Intrepid Museum in New York but still worth visiting.

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by okaydo View Post
    UC Berkeley alum Jimmy Doolittle led the first bombing of Tokyo on April 18, 1942 -- a mere 4 months after Pearl Harbor.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doolittle_Raid
    Thank you for remembering. Once upon a time most Cal alums knew about this. Now few do. So many of the people who accomplished tremendous things in that era were truly humble about it afterwards. No huge monuments, no commercial venturers building on their fame after; no grand parades when they died or holidays later to celebrate them. So many people since are so much better remembered - and often for so much less. We've made selling ones self into an art - and now think of it as almost a requirement for prosperity and "success." Such a different ethos.

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by TomBear View Post
    The strike group will be in position soon enough.

    I'm not familiar with the Hornet museum. Please forgive my ignorance, but is the carrier itself there, or is there a building housing the displays?
    Also, it is not the same Hornet. The Hornet that the Doolittle Raiders flew off of was sunk in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands only a few months after the Doolittle Raid. The replacement Hornet also has a pretty awesome history--including during WWII and, later, picking up Apollo astronauts who had landed on the moon--and is well worth visiting. I love the docents. One guy had worked in the engine room and showed us where he had literally made marks counting down the days until his tour of duty was up. Each time I visit, I think about how many brave pilots took off from the carrier and never returned.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •