TV - something to remember

3,360 Views | 29 Replies | Last: 1 mo ago by sycasey
Larno
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Many of you are too young to remember but up until 1984 the NCAA controlled all college football TV games. This meant that there were only a handful of games on Saturday, some national and some regional. Then the Supreme Court ruled against this monopoly, and now we have essentially every game on TV. For not that many years now it's been possible to watch every Cal football game on TV if you had the right subscriptions. But before that we might get a handful of games, or less. Try having to listen to Starkey for years to follow any Cal away game (I didn't, just checked in once in a while for the score. And having to wait a long time for him to say it). Yes, it was convenient to know that every home game was going to be at 12:30 or 1:00. But I would gladly give that up to have every single game, home and away, available on TV. Since I started watching Cal games in 1964 there are countless away games I would have loved to see on TV. I'll watch any time, any day.
okaydo
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2011 was the last season that not every Cal game was available on TV.
BearHunter
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I went from radio, to TV, and back to radio.

Then I choose to catch the replay or highlights online.
Bobodeluxe
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BearHunter said:

I went from radio, to TV, and back to radio.

Then I choose to catch the replay or highlights online.
Or just come here to read comments about it.

And laugh.
RedlessWardrobe
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Since you brought up radio I would like to bring up my evaluation of the new Cal radio announcer.

Let me start by saying that last Saturday's game was the first I've listened to without video in several years. I anticipated that finally a Cal football radio broadcast would finally be easier to listen to since I knew there was a new guy calling the games.

It wasn't. The new guy and the old guy share one of the biggest flaws in doing football on radio. Had to be at least 75% of the time when the play was being run there was no indication of where the ball was. This should be mandatory on every play. While the description of the play is important, it means nothing if the listener has no idea where the ball is. Many times the ending location of the football is mentioned several seconds after the play is over, almost as an afterthought.

Newsflash to new guy: A great amount of people listening to you are NOT also watching the game on TV. If a wide receiver catches a pass, a good announcer will incorporate an approximate guess as to where the ball is caught. Also at the beginning of the play how about making it normal to give the down and distance? How about a little more frequency of updates on time left in the quarter? And yes giving the score once in a while would be a good idea.

RIP Bill King
HearstMining
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BearHunter said:

I went from radio, to TV, and back to radio.

Then I choose to catch the replay or highlights online.
Of course, I have home-town bias, but I still think Lon Simmons (for his dry wit) and Bill King (for his ability to convey the excitement) were the best football radio announcers I ever heard. While I acknowledge that Greg Papa seems to do his research, I just don't care for his delivery.
6956bear
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HearstMining said:

BearHunter said:

I went from radio, to TV, and back to radio.

Then I choose to catch the replay or highlights online.
Of course, I have home-town bias, but I still think Lon Simmons (for his dry wit) and Bill King (for his ability to convey the excitement) were the best football radio announcers I ever heard. While I acknowledge that Greg Papa seems to do his research, I just don't care for his delivery.
Papa is a fine caller of the game. I hate how much "industry jargon" he puts into his delivery. A large number of fans have zero clue what 3 technique means. Or the A gap. He steps on his analyst too many times for my liking. What is good with the Cal broadcast is Mike Pawlawski.

Papa needs to call the game and let Tim Ryan analyze it.
JimSox
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RedlessWardrobe said:

Since you brought up radio I would like to bring up my evaluation of the new Cal radio announcer.

Let me start by saying that last Saturday's game was the first I've listened to without video in several years. I anticipated that finally a Cal football radio broadcast would finally be easier to listen to since I knew there was a new guy calling the games.

It wasn't. The new guy and the old guy share one of the biggest flaws in doing football on radio. Had to be at least 75% of the time when the play was being run there was no indication of where the ball was. This should be mandatory on every play. While the description of the play is important, it means nothing if the listener has no idea where the ball is. Many times the ending location of the football is mentioned several seconds after the play is over, almost as an afterthought.

Newsflash to new guy: A great amount of people listening to you are NOT also watching the game on TV. If a wide receiver catches a pass, a good announcer will incorporate an approximate guess as to where the ball is caught. Also at the beginning of the play how about making it normal to give the down and distance? How about a little more frequency of updates on time left in the quarter? And yes giving the score once in a while would be a good idea.

RIP Bill King


I noticed the exact same things about Allegri the first game I listened to with him at the mic. Starkey actually got better at this sort of thing late in his career after so many years of criticism. Justin, please tell us the result of the play. Is it a first down or not?
sycasey
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okaydo said:

2011 was the last season that not every Cal game was available on TV.

Huh, I thought it was 2009 (vs WSU). Which game was blacked out in 2011?
golden sloth
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sycasey said:

okaydo said:

2011 was the last season that not every Cal game was available on TV.

Huh, I thought it was 2009 (vs WSU). Which game was blacked out in 2011?


I vaguely remember having to use a sketchy stream for the game against the Presbyterian Blue Hose at ATT ballpark.
RedlessWardrobe
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JimSox said:

RedlessWardrobe said:

Since you brought up radio I would like to bring up my evaluation of the new Cal radio announcer.

Let me start by saying that last Saturday's game was the first I've listened to without video in several years. I anticipated that finally a Cal football radio broadcast would finally be easier to listen to since I knew there was a new guy calling the games.

It wasn't. The new guy and the old guy share one of the biggest flaws in doing football on radio. Had to be at least 75% of the time when the play was being run there was no indication of where the ball was. This should be mandatory on every play. While the description of the play is important, it means nothing if the listener has no idea where the ball is. Many times the ending location of the football is mentioned several seconds after the play is over, almost as an afterthought.

Newsflash to new guy: A great amount of people listening to you are NOT also watching the game on TV. If a wide receiver catches a pass, a good announcer will incorporate an approximate guess as to where the ball is caught. Also at the beginning of the play how about making it normal to give the down and distance? How about a little more frequency of updates on time left in the quarter? And yes giving the score once in a while would be a good idea.

RIP Bill King


I noticed the exact same things about Allegri the first game I listened to with him at the mic. Starkey actually got better at this sort of thing late in his career after so many years of criticism. Justin, please tell us the result of the play. Is it a first down or not?
Appreciate your comment but let me pile on again, where is the ball? (There's a big stripe every 5 yards, just an APPROXIMATE location is all I ask.)
okaydo
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sycasey said:

okaydo said:

2011 was the last season that not every Cal game was available on TV.

Huh, I thought it was 2009 (vs WSU). Which game was blacked out in 2011?

sycasey
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golden sloth said:

sycasey said:

okaydo said:

2011 was the last season that not every Cal game was available on TV.

Huh, I thought it was 2009 (vs WSU). Which game was blacked out in 2011?


I vaguely remember having to use a sketchy stream for the game against the Presbyterian Blue Hose at ATT ballpark.

That is weird, because I vaguely remember watching that on local TV too. But I guess it wasn't televised.
MrGPAC
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I wonder what the current state of things would be had the Supreme Court not taken the games away from the NCAA.

Market forces are why every game is televised, not it being taken away from the NCAA. I would wager all games would still be televised or streamed as they are today. I do wonder what the media payouts would look like with a single entity negotiating all games for all conferences. Would this round of re-alignment have occurred at all? Would the Pac12 still exist? What would the media pay out look like?
sycasey
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MrGPAC said:

I wonder what the current state of things would be had the Supreme Court not taken the games away from the NCAA.

Market forces are why every game is televised, not it being taken away from the NCAA. I would wager all games would still be televised or streamed as they are today. I do wonder what the media payouts would look like with a single entity negotiating all games for all conferences. Would this round of re-alignment have occurred at all? Would the Pac12 still exist? What would the media pay out look like?

If TV payments were standardized then conferences would probably still put a premium on staying local to minimize travel. So yeah, the Pac would have stayed together.
golden sloth
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sycasey said:

golden sloth said:

sycasey said:

okaydo said:

2011 was the last season that not every Cal game was available on TV.

Huh, I thought it was 2009 (vs WSU). Which game was blacked out in 2011?


I vaguely remember having to use a sketchy stream for the game against the Presbyterian Blue Hose at ATT ballpark.

That is weird, because I vaguely remember watching that on local TV too. But I guess it wasn't televised.


I was living in Orange County at the time, so it might have been local in the bay.
golden sloth
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sycasey said:

MrGPAC said:

I wonder what the current state of things would be had the Supreme Court not taken the games away from the NCAA.

Market forces are why every game is televised, not it being taken away from the NCAA. I would wager all games would still be televised or streamed as they are today. I do wonder what the media payouts would look like with a single entity negotiating all games for all conferences. Would this round of re-alignment have occurred at all? Would the Pac12 still exist? What would the media pay out look like?

If TV payments were standardized then conferences would probably still put a premium on staying local to minimize travel. So yeah, the Pac would have stayed together.


It would have been interesting to see how they divide the money. I cant see the Big Ten and the SEC receiving an equal share to the MAC or Sun Belt conferences.
BearSD
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golden sloth said:

sycasey said:

MrGPAC said:

I wonder what the current state of things would be had the Supreme Court not taken the games away from the NCAA.

Market forces are why every game is televised, not it being taken away from the NCAA. I would wager all games would still be televised or streamed as they are today. I do wonder what the media payouts would look like with a single entity negotiating all games for all conferences. Would this round of re-alignment have occurred at all? Would the Pac12 still exist? What would the media pay out look like?

If TV payments were standardized then conferences would probably still put a premium on staying local to minimize travel. So yeah, the Pac would have stayed together.


It would have been interesting to see how they divide the money. I cant see the Big Ten and the SEC receiving an equal share to the MAC or Sun Belt conferences.


That's why Georgia and Oklahoma sued the NCAA in the 1970s, to end the equal division of money and exposure.
maxer
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Larno said:

Many of you are too young to remember but up until 1984 the NCAA controlled all college football TV games. This meant that there were only a handful of games on Saturday, some national and some regional. Then the Supreme Court ruled against this monopoly, and now we have essentially every game on TV. For not that many years now it's been possible to watch every Cal football game on TV if you had the right subscriptions. But before that we might get a handful of games, or less. Try having to listen to Starkey for years to follow any Cal away game (I didn't, just checked in once in a while for the score. And having to wait a long time for him to say it). Yes, it was convenient to know that every home game was going to be at 12:30 or 1:00. But I would gladly give that up to have every single game, home and away, available on TV. Since I started watching Cal games in 1964 there are countless away games I would have loved to see on TV. I'll watch any time, any day.
I think you're mistaking some cause and effect here.

How many channels were there in 1984?
sycasey
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maxer said:

Larno said:

Many of you are too young to remember but up until 1984 the NCAA controlled all college football TV games. This meant that there were only a handful of games on Saturday, some national and some regional. Then the Supreme Court ruled against this monopoly, and now we have essentially every game on TV. For not that many years now it's been possible to watch every Cal football game on TV if you had the right subscriptions. But before that we might get a handful of games, or less. Try having to listen to Starkey for years to follow any Cal away game (I didn't, just checked in once in a while for the score. And having to wait a long time for him to say it). Yes, it was convenient to know that every home game was going to be at 12:30 or 1:00. But I would gladly give that up to have every single game, home and away, available on TV. Since I started watching Cal games in 1964 there are countless away games I would have loved to see on TV. I'll watch any time, any day.
I think you're mistaking some cause and effect here.

How many channels were there in 1984?

The NCAA almost certainly would have set up a streaming platform for all games, at minimum. Which is pretty much what happens now. All FBS games are at least streamed somewhere.
LunchTime
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Larno said:

Many of you are too young to remember but up until 1984 the NCAA controlled all college football TV games. This meant that there were only a handful of games on Saturday, some national and some regional. Then the Supreme Court ruled against this monopoly, and now we have essentially every game on TV. For not that many years now it's been possible to watch every Cal football game on TV if you had the right subscriptions. But before that we might get a handful of games, or less. Try having to listen to Starkey for years to follow any Cal away game (I didn't, just checked in once in a while for the score. And having to wait a long time for him to say it). Yes, it was convenient to know that every home game was going to be at 12:30 or 1:00. But I would gladly give that up to have every single game, home and away, available on TV. Since I started watching Cal games in 1964 there are countless away games I would have loved to see on TV. I'll watch any time, any day.


The tradeoff wasn't worth it.

Back in 1984, I could go to every home game as a 3 year old and have a blast with all my mom and dad's college buddies.

Now I rarely take my kids to games. The screeching of the PA stadium ads cause them to have a miserable time. The cost is absurd because TV money inflated costs so much that TV money would never be enough for schools that now had national brand reach.

My dad's group of 20 people's season tickets then ensured that if anyone dropped out (or died) there was enough people to grab someone else to reload the group. During Tedford they discouraged large groups and then broke them up. Now I can go to games alone, drag my poor kids to a horrid experience or... ? And the kicker is TV money DIRECTLY destroyed every rivalry and tradition outside the Big Game that Cal had.

I went to Idaho and thought I would give the ATO a shot. $210? I went to Auburn and paid $150 for the same seats, including a $50 service fee to gametime.

TV ruined Cal football from the fan experience to price to the demand that we pay coaches millions, to now paying players and letting gymnasts make money on Instagram.

Everything about college football, and college athletics in general, went to **** with the cash TV money brought and the hell that lust for money created.

I would GLADLY listen to the radio for 30 minutes waiting to hear a score than take the TV any time hellscape that we ended up with.
KoreAmBear
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Larno said:

Many of you are too young to remember but up until 1984 the NCAA controlled all college football TV games. This meant that there were only a handful of games on Saturday, some national and some regional. Then the Supreme Court ruled against this monopoly, and now we have essentially every game on TV. For not that many years now it's been possible to watch every Cal football game on TV if you had the right subscriptions. But before that we might get a handful of games, or less. Try having to listen to Starkey for years to follow any Cal away game (I didn't, just checked in once in a while for the score. And having to wait a long time for him to say it). Yes, it was convenient to know that every home game was going to be at 12:30 or 1:00. But I would gladly give that up to have every single game, home and away, available on TV. Since I started watching Cal games in 1964 there are countless away games I would have loved to see on TV. I'll watch any time, any day.
By the way, the Flutie Hail Mary game was in 1984. I recall it being a weekday game that happened to be on TV on CBS. Flutie v. Kosar. It must have been a holiday (or winter break) because there was no school and I was at home watching it. Hard to forget that one.
Larno
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maxer said:

Larno said:

Many of you are too young to remember but up until 1984 the NCAA controlled all college football TV games. This meant that there were only a handful of games on Saturday, some national and some regional. Then the Supreme Court ruled against this monopoly, and now we have essentially every game on TV. For not that many years now it's been possible to watch every Cal football game on TV if you had the right subscriptions. But before that we might get a handful of games, or less. Try having to listen to Starkey for years to follow any Cal away game (I didn't, just checked in once in a while for the score. And having to wait a long time for him to say it). Yes, it was convenient to know that every home game was going to be at 12:30 or 1:00. But I would gladly give that up to have every single game, home and away, available on TV. Since I started watching Cal games in 1964 there are countless away games I would have loved to see on TV. I'll watch any time, any day.
I think you're mistaking some cause and effect here.

How many channels were there in 1984?
Valid point. I think there were regional games and then a national one, probably on one network. ESPN started in 1978 but did not have college football for quite a while. However, if the NCAA had not controlled the rights to the games with the network(s) would there have been an opportunity for local stations to broadcast games? For example, would Channel 2 in San Francisco broadcast Cal and Stanford games? Would there be enough dollars around to make it happen? Maybe, maybe not, but that would not be a problem in Texas or Ohio or Florida or any of the big programs. The dollars would flow freely.
dimitrig
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KoreAmBear said:

Larno said:

Many of you are too young to remember but up until 1984 the NCAA controlled all college football TV games. This meant that there were only a handful of games on Saturday, some national and some regional. Then the Supreme Court ruled against this monopoly, and now we have essentially every game on TV. For not that many years now it's been possible to watch every Cal football game on TV if you had the right subscriptions. But before that we might get a handful of games, or less. Try having to listen to Starkey for years to follow any Cal away game (I didn't, just checked in once in a while for the score. And having to wait a long time for him to say it). Yes, it was convenient to know that every home game was going to be at 12:30 or 1:00. But I would gladly give that up to have every single game, home and away, available on TV. Since I started watching Cal games in 1964 there are countless away games I would have loved to see on TV. I'll watch any time, any day.
By the way, the Flutie Hail Mary game was in 1984. I recall it being a weekday game that happened to be on TV on CBS. Flutie v. Kosar. It must have been a holiday (or winter break) because there was no school and I was at home watching it. Hard to forget that one.


November 23, 1984 which was the Friday after Thanksgiving



KoreAmBear
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dimitrig said:

KoreAmBear said:

Larno said:

Many of you are too young to remember but up until 1984 the NCAA controlled all college football TV games. This meant that there were only a handful of games on Saturday, some national and some regional. Then the Supreme Court ruled against this monopoly, and now we have essentially every game on TV. For not that many years now it's been possible to watch every Cal football game on TV if you had the right subscriptions. But before that we might get a handful of games, or less. Try having to listen to Starkey for years to follow any Cal away game (I didn't, just checked in once in a while for the score. And having to wait a long time for him to say it). Yes, it was convenient to know that every home game was going to be at 12:30 or 1:00. But I would gladly give that up to have every single game, home and away, available on TV. Since I started watching Cal games in 1964 there are countless away games I would have loved to see on TV. I'll watch any time, any day.
By the way, the Flutie Hail Mary game was in 1984. I recall it being a weekday game that happened to be on TV on CBS. Flutie v. Kosar. It must have been a holiday (or winter break) because there was no school and I was at home watching it. Hard to forget that one.


November 23, 1984 which was the Friday after Thanksgiving






Makes sense. Almost two years to the day of The Play.
oskidunker
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LunchTime said:

Larno said:

Many of you are too young to remember but up until 1984 the NCAA controlled all college football TV games. This meant that there were only a handful of games on Saturday, some national and some regional. Then the Supreme Court ruled against this monopoly, and now we have essentially every game on TV. For not that many years now it's been possible to watch every Cal football game on TV if you had the right subscriptions. But before that we might get a handful of games, or less. Try having to listen to Starkey for years to follow any Cal away game (I didn't, just checked in once in a while for the score. And having to wait a long time for him to say it). Yes, it was convenient to know that every home game was going to be at 12:30 or 1:00. But I would gladly give that up to have every single game, home and away, available on TV. Since I started watching Cal games in 1964 there are countless away games I would have loved to see on TV. I'll watch any time, any day.


The tradeoff wasn't worth it.

Back in 1984, I could go to every home game as a 3 year old and have a blast with all my mom and dad's college buddies.

Now I rarely take my kids to games. The screeching of the PA stadium ads cause them to have a miserable time. The cost is absurd because TV money inflated costs so much that TV money would never be enough for schools that now had national brand reach.

My dad's group of 20 people's season tickets then ensured that if anyone dropped out (or died) there was enough people to grab someone else to reload the group. During Tedford they discouraged large groups and then broke them up. Now I can go to games alone, drag my poor kids to a horrid experience or... ? And the kicker is TV money DIRECTLY destroyed every rivalry and tradition outside the Big Game that Cal had.

I went to Idaho and thought I would give the ATO a shot. $210? I went to Auburn and paid $150 for the same seats, including a $50 service fee to gametime.

TV ruined Cal football from the fan experience to price to the demand that we pay coaches millions, to now paying players and letting gymnasts make money on Instagram.

Everything about college football, and college athletics in general, went to **** with the cash TV money brought and the hell that lust for money created.

I would GLADLY listen to the radio for 30 minutes waiting to hear a score than take the TV any time hellscape that we ended up with.
Game time is cheaper than stub hub. Thanks for the info. Stub hub is charging 40% in fees. No parking passes on game time, though.
Go Bears!
pasadenaorbust
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Larno said:

Many of you are too young to remember but up until 1984 the NCAA controlled all college football TV games. This meant that there were only a handful of games on Saturday, some national and some regional. Then the Supreme Court ruled against this monopoly, and now we have essentially every game on TV. For not that many years now it's been possible to watch every Cal football game on TV if you had the right subscriptions. But before that we might get a handful of games, or less. Try having to listen to Starkey for years to follow any Cal away game (I didn't, just checked in once in a while for the score. And having to wait a long time for him to say it). Yes, it was convenient to know that every home game was going to be at 12:30 or 1:00. But I would gladly give that up to have every single game, home and away, available on TV. Since I started watching Cal games in 1964 there are countless away games I would have loved to see on TV. I'll watch any time, any day.
However, you did have the pleasure of listening to Chris Schenkel and Bud Wilkenson call a football game...



"what a way to spend an autumn afternoon"
HearstMining
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LunchTime said:

Larno said:

Many of you are too young to remember but up until 1984 the NCAA controlled all college football TV games. This meant that there were only a handful of games on Saturday, some national and some regional. Then the Supreme Court ruled against this monopoly, and now we have essentially every game on TV. For not that many years now it's been possible to watch every Cal football game on TV if you had the right subscriptions. But before that we might get a handful of games, or less. Try having to listen to Starkey for years to follow any Cal away game (I didn't, just checked in once in a while for the score. And having to wait a long time for him to say it). Yes, it was convenient to know that every home game was going to be at 12:30 or 1:00. But I would gladly give that up to have every single game, home and away, available on TV. Since I started watching Cal games in 1964 there are countless away games I would have loved to see on TV. I'll watch any time, any day.


The tradeoff wasn't worth it.

Back in 1984, I could go to every home game as a 3 year old and have a blast with all my mom and dad's college buddies.

Now I rarely take my kids to games. The screeching of the PA stadium ads cause them to have a miserable time. The cost is absurd because TV money inflated costs so much that TV money would never be enough for schools that now had national brand reach.

My dad's group of 20 people's season tickets then ensured that if anyone dropped out (or died) there was enough people to grab someone else to reload the group. During Tedford they discouraged large groups and then broke them up. Now I can go to games alone, drag my poor kids to a horrid experience or... ? And the kicker is TV money DIRECTLY destroyed every rivalry and tradition outside the Big Game that Cal had.

I went to Idaho and thought I would give the ATO a shot. $210? I went to Auburn and paid $150 for the same seats, including a $50 service fee to gametime.

TV ruined Cal football from the fan experience to price to the demand that we pay coaches millions, to now paying players and letting gymnasts make money on Instagram.

Everything about college football, and college athletics in general, went to **** with the cash TV money brought and the hell that lust for money created.

I would GLADLY listen to the radio for 30 minutes waiting to hear a score than take the TV any time hellscape that we ended up with.
I've had the best luck with tickpick.com. Fees are folded into the quoted price so no nasty surprise at checkout time. We knew the crowd wouldn't be large, so bought the cheapest seats available, $18 each and about the end of the 1st quarter, moved over into TT about 25 rows up and had lots of space around us. Yes, the sound system still sucked, but when the sun came out at halftime, it was lovely. And the post-game pilgrimage to Triple Rock for a burger, fries, and their excellent beer.
Chapman_is_Gone
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Just FYI, both Seatgeek and Stubhub have a toggle switch that allows showing all ticket prices inclusive of fees. Easy peasy.
sycasey
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golden sloth said:

sycasey said:

okaydo said:

2011 was the last season that not every Cal game was available on TV.

Huh, I thought it was 2009 (vs WSU). Which game was blacked out in 2011?


I vaguely remember having to use a sketchy stream for the game against the Presbyterian Blue Hose at ATT ballpark.
Weird bump, but I think I found the answer to this:

According to the Matt Sarzyniak site (IMO, the best one for tracking which college game is going to be on which channel), the Presbyterian game was streamed on cbssports.com:

https://mattsarzsports.com/Schedule/Weekly/football2011/3

That's probably what I remember seeing. So technically not "on TV," but there was a broadcast of a sort.
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