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Cal Basketball

Juhwan Harris-Dyson Enters Transfer Portal

April 16, 2020
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Junior guard Juhwan Harris-Dyson has entered the transfer portal and will likely leave the Cal men’s hoops team The 6-6 guard from Northridge, California will have one more year of eligibility. Harris-Dyson becomes the second player to announce intentions to transfer from the men’s hoops team, following sophomore forward Jacobi Gordon.

A three-star recruit that was ranked No. 144 in 247 Sport’s composite ranking, Harris-Dyson averaged 6.2 points and 3.4 rebounds in about 19 minutes per game his freshmen season at Cal. That season, Harris-Dyson played in 30 games and started 19 games including 16 of the team’s last 17 games.

But Harris-Dyson’s numbers slid during his sophomore year when he averaged less than 17 minutes, 3.5 points, and 2.0 rebounds per game. He played in all but one game but only started in nine games. Harris-Dyson’s shooting percentages also dropped from 49.3% to 40.8% from the field from his freshman to sophomore season. During his second year, Harris-Dyson also had his minutes cut into by fellow sophomores Justice Sueing and Darius McNeil and then-freshman Matt Bradley.

With the transfers of Sueing and McNeil, Harris-Dyson looked poised to break into the regular rotation this past season. But an early-season injury and then academic ineligibility derailed that and he only ended up playing in 13 games and missed almost all of Pac-12 play. In those games, Harris-Dyson averaged 4.0 points and 1.8 rebounds in just 14.5 minutes.

Head coach Mark Fox now has three open scholarships. One scholarship was left open this season, two were opened by the graduations of Paris Austin and Kareem South, and now another two were opened from the departures of Gordon and Harris-Dyson. Fox has signed two freshmen wings in Monty Bowser and Jalen Celestine.

Fox seems to be searching to fill those openings in the graduate transfer and transfer markets. Cal has been tied to Hawaii point guard Drew Buggs, Fresno State combo guard Jarred Hyder, Penn wing Ryan Betley, and Western Michigan combo guard Michael Flowers. Buggs, Hyder, and Flowers are all traditional transfers and would have to sit out for a season per NCAA transfer rules. Betley is a graduate transfer and would be available immediately.

Discussion from...

Juhwan Harris-Dyson Enters Transfer Portal

4,886 Views | 27 Replies | Last: 1 mo ago by oskidunker
parentswerebears
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Not surprised. Saw this happening months ago. Good Luck, JHD!
oskidunker
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Hope he finds a good place.
GivemTheAxe
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parentswerebears said:

Not surprised. Saw this happening months ago. Good Luck, JHD!


At least this transfer is understandable and not like the flood of transfers last year that reflected broad dissatisfaction among the players
71Bear
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Keep an eye on the NCAA's one-time transfer waiver decision that is forthcoming in the next 90 days. It would apply to the three potential "traditional" transfers noted in the article. In other words, all three may be eligible in the fall regardless where they transfer.
SFCityBear
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Too Bad. I wish him success wherever he goes. Only a year of eligibility left, but he played so little that it seems like it was only yesterday that he arrived.

As to the Hawaii point guard available, If we get him, I only hope he is as good as Bobbitt or Smith, the two Hawaii guards who torched Cal's guards for 36 points in the NCAA of 2016. Which reminds me, both of them were from the Bay Area. Who was the Cal coach who overlooked them while recruiting?
ManBearLion123
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I believe Buggs is actually a grad transfer, no?
NathanAllen
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Staff
ManBearLion123 said:

I believe Buggs is actually a grad transfer, no?
This is correct.

A bit more on Buggs: He tore his ACL right before college and redshirted his freshmen year before playing the last three years. He's set to graduate in May and has said he wants to play closer to home (Long Beach) or at a higher level than Hawaii. But he's also not convinced he wants to leave Hawaii and there's a chance he stays put. His mother passed away from cancer this past year and that is playing a role in his decision to explore his options.
calumnus
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SFCityBear said:

Too Bad. I wish him success wherever he goes. Only a year of eligibility left, but he played so little that it seems like it was only yesterday that he arrived.

As to the Hawaii point guard available, If we get him, I only hope he is as good as Bobbitt or Smith, the two Hawaii guards who torched Cal's guards for 36 points in the NCAA of 2016. Which reminds me, both of them were from the Bay Area. Who was the Cal coach who overlooked them while recruiting?


Bobbitt graduated from Castro Valley and Smith graduated from Deer Valley in 2011. Monty was Cal's coach.

SFCityBear
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calumnus said:

SFCityBear said:

Too Bad. I wish him success wherever he goes. Only a year of eligibility left, but he played so little that it seems like it was only yesterday that he arrived.

As to the Hawaii point guard available, If we get him, I only hope he is as good as Bobbitt or Smith, the two Hawaii guards who torched Cal's guards for 36 points in the NCAA of 2016. Which reminds me, both of them were from the Bay Area. Who was the Cal coach who overlooked them while recruiting?


Bobbitt graduated from Castro Valley and Smith graduated from Deer Valley in 2011. Monty was Cal's coach.


That was on Monty's watch. Maybe they didn't have the academic creds to get into Cal. So were they both 5th year seniors then in 2016?
CALiforniALUM
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A question. If you enter the transfer protocol a player isn't actually giving up their spot on the team, correct? You can enter and then come back without any downside?

Based on my assumption, it would be interesting if the NCAA allowed a player to transfer, but the hook was that if your team could fill your spot before you came back (e.g., pulled your name from the transfer protocol) you would be on outside looking in.

I like systems that are open but not in a way that doesn't favor one side of the equation. (maybe I am a Republican? ).

Dyson can enter to find a better landing spot but should be able to do so with the downside risk that if Cal recruits somebody to replace him then he might be without a school.

I don't mind transfers, but you have to think that it only helps normalize the quality level of D1 basketball. Good players find their happy best place option while bad players find worse place options (where does Cal fit into that spectrum?). Really bad players find themselves looking at non Division 1 teams. That suggests there might be opportunities for non-Div-1 players to move up too.
TheSouseFamily
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The only downside is that a school doesn't have to honor the scholarship commitment to a player who enters the portal. So if they don't want him back, they don't need to take him back. Some coaches like Justin Fuente at VaTech in football have used that provision as a threat of sorts to players thinking about exploring their options. But as a practical matter, once a player enters the portal, he's either gone or the school gladly takes him back.
oskidunker
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Hardly a coincidence that Dyson leaves and the guy from Penn is announced the next day, in my opinion.
TheSouseFamily
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Nice message. I wish him well and hope he finds a good spot.

BC Calfan
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oskidunker said:

Hardly a coincidence that Dyson leaves and the guy from Penn is announced the next day, in my opinion.
Do you mean Betley may have been factoring PT into his decision---and JHD leaving opened up minutes? Because they are very different players.

Or that the other 2 slots are silently spoken for? Which would be great.
Civil Bear
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BC Calfan said:

oskidunker said:

Hardly a coincidence that Dyson leaves and the guy from Penn is announced the next day, in my opinion.
Do you mean Betley may have been factoring PT into his decision---and JHD leaving opened up minutes? Because they are very different players.

Or that the other 2 slots are silently spoken for? Which would be great.
Very different players that play the same position - so available minutes could have been a factor.
SFCityBear
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TheSouseFamily said:

Nice message. I wish him well and hope he finds a good spot.


Beautifully written, and from the heart.

It makes me wonder why someone who writes this well would have trouble with academics at Cal, as was reported elsewhere, unless he was majoring in nuclear physics or something as challenging.

He gave his best at Cal, and never lacked for effort and intensity, despite being plagued by injuries and illness. Good individual defenders are a disappearing breed. I'll miss him, and wish him the best of everything life has to offer going forward.
SpartanBear20
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SFCityBear said:

TheSouseFamily said:

Nice message. I wish him well and hope he finds a good spot.


Beautifully written, and from the heart.

It makes me wonder why someone who writes this well would have trouble with academics at Cal, as was reported elsewhere, unless he was majoring in nuclear physics or something as challenging.

He gave his best at Cal, and never lacked for effort and intensity, despite being plagued by injuries and illness. Good individual defenders are a disappearing breed. I'll miss him, and wish him the best of everything life has to offer going forward.
Well said. BTW, the Cal athletics website lists JHD's major as undeclared. (But a lot of athletic departments don't update majors like athletic stats.)
rkt88edmo
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SFCityBear said:


Beautifully written, and from the heart.

It makes me wonder why someone who writes this well would have trouble with academics at Cal, as was reported elsewhere, unless he was majoring in nuclear physics or something as challenging.

C'mon - you can't really judge academic capability from a 300 word blurb, no matter how well written. Especially having to balance all that stuff with being an athlete.

I only read stmts from student athletes leaving Cal, and this is by far the most heartfelt one. I wish he was able to turn the corner and get his playing time and a degree here.
SFCityBear
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rkt88edmo said:

SFCityBear said:


Beautifully written, and from the heart.

It makes me wonder why someone who writes this well would have trouble with academics at Cal, as was reported elsewhere, unless he was majoring in nuclear physics or something as challenging.

C'mon - you can't really judge academic capability from a 300 word blurb, no matter how well written. Especially having to balance all that stuff with being an athlete.

I only read stmts from student athletes leaving Cal, and this is by far the most heartfelt one. I wish he was able to turn the corner and get his playing time and a degree here.
You make some good points. I attended Cal in the 1960s, when it was much easier to get accepted but much harder to stay in school. I knew many, many athletes and other students who flunked out. The graduation rate was a little over 50%, compared to 91% today. I believe I have read that athletes today are mentored, tutored, and supervised, in an effort to help those that are behind, keep up with other students to keep the graduation rates up. Not only that, but athletes are on full scholarships, and don't have to work 20 hours a week to retain their scholarships, as they did in the Cal basketball program of the 1950s.
Civil Bear
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SFCityBear said:

rkt88edmo said:

SFCityBear said:


Beautifully written, and from the heart.

It makes me wonder why someone who writes this well would have trouble with academics at Cal, as was reported elsewhere, unless he was majoring in nuclear physics or something as challenging.

C'mon - you can't really judge academic capability from a 300 word blurb, no matter how well written. Especially having to balance all that stuff with being an athlete.

I only read stmts from student athletes leaving Cal, and this is by far the most heartfelt one. I wish he was able to turn the corner and get his playing time and a degree here.
You make some good points. I attended Cal in the 1960s, when it was much easier to get accepted but much harder to stay in school. I knew many, many athletes and other students who flunked out. The graduation rate was a little over 50%, compared to 91% today. I believe I have read that athletes today are mentored, tutored, and supervised, in an effort to help those that are behind, keep up with other students to keep the graduation rates up. Not only that, but athletes are on full scholarships, and don't have to work 20 hours a week to retain their scholarships, as they did in the Cal basketball program of the 1950s.
Can I ask where you got that 91% rate?
rkt88edmo
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SFCityBear said:


You make some good points. I attended Cal in the 1960s, when it was much easier to get accepted but much harder to stay in school. I knew many, many athletes and other students who flunked out. The graduation rate was a little over 50%, compared to 91% today. I believe I have read that athletes today are mentored, tutored, and supervised, in an effort to help those that are behind, keep up with other students to keep the graduation rates up. Not only that, but athletes are on full scholarships, and don't have to work 20 hours a week to retain their scholarships, as they did in the Cal basketball program of the 1950s.
While I appreciate your compliment and weird subtext. I will just say I think a lot of what you are pointing out reflect the homogeneity of the student body as well as the much more homogenous high school education results of the respective eras. I doubt you would find the similarly widespread differences between the academic achievement levels of the standard student body and scholarship student athletes that seem to exist now to be as prevalent in the 50s.

I could be wrong.
SFCityBear
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Civil Bear said:

SFCityBear said:

rkt88edmo said:

SFCityBear said:


Beautifully written, and from the heart.

It makes me wonder why someone who writes this well would have trouble with academics at Cal, as was reported elsewhere, unless he was majoring in nuclear physics or something as challenging.

C'mon - you can't really judge academic capability from a 300 word blurb, no matter how well written. Especially having to balance all that stuff with being an athlete.

I only read stmts from student athletes leaving Cal, and this is by far the most heartfelt one. I wish he was able to turn the corner and get his playing time and a degree here.
You make some good points. I attended Cal in the 1960s, when it was much easier to get accepted but much harder to stay in school. I knew many, many athletes and other students who flunked out. The graduation rate was a little over 50%, compared to 91% today. I believe I have read that athletes today are mentored, tutored, and supervised, in an effort to help those that are behind, keep up with other students to keep the graduation rates up. Not only that, but athletes are on full scholarships, and don't have to work 20 hours a week to retain their scholarships, as they did in the Cal basketball program of the 1950s.
Can I ask where you got that 91% rate?
Sure. I can't vouch for the accuracy, but this was the first thing that came up in my google search: https://www.univstats.com/colleges/university-of-california-berkeley/graduation-rate
Big C
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SFCityBear said:

Civil Bear said:

SFCityBear said:

rkt88edmo said:

SFCityBear said:


Beautifully written, and from the heart.

It makes me wonder why someone who writes this well would have trouble with academics at Cal, as was reported elsewhere, unless he was majoring in nuclear physics or something as challenging.

C'mon - you can't really judge academic capability from a 300 word blurb, no matter how well written. Especially having to balance all that stuff with being an athlete.

I only read stmts from student athletes leaving Cal, and this is by far the most heartfelt one. I wish he was able to turn the corner and get his playing time and a degree here.
You make some good points. I attended Cal in the 1960s, when it was much easier to get accepted but much harder to stay in school. I knew many, many athletes and other students who flunked out. The graduation rate was a little over 50%, compared to 91% today. I believe I have read that athletes today are mentored, tutored, and supervised, in an effort to help those that are behind, keep up with other students to keep the graduation rates up. Not only that, but athletes are on full scholarships, and don't have to work 20 hours a week to retain their scholarships, as they did in the Cal basketball program of the 1950s.
Can I ask where you got that 91% rate?
Sure. I can't vouch for the accuracy, but this was the first thing that came up in my google search: https://www.univstats.com/colleges/university-of-california-berkeley/graduation-rate
It wouldn't surprise me. Some factors:

It's so hard to get in and it's so expensive now that incoming undergrads are quite accomplished, focused and motivated to maximize their opportunity.

Most undergrads accepted to Cal now come in with enough AP credits to practically be sophomores, units-wise, before they even set foot on campus (which is a questionable practice from a number of different angles, IMO).
Civil Bear
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SFCityBear said:

Civil Bear said:

SFCityBear said:

rkt88edmo said:

SFCityBear said:


Beautifully written, and from the heart.

It makes me wonder why someone who writes this well would have trouble with academics at Cal, as was reported elsewhere, unless he was majoring in nuclear physics or something as challenging.

C'mon - you can't really judge academic capability from a 300 word blurb, no matter how well written. Especially having to balance all that stuff with being an athlete.

I only read stmts from student athletes leaving Cal, and this is by far the most heartfelt one. I wish he was able to turn the corner and get his playing time and a degree here.
You make some good points. I attended Cal in the 1960s, when it was much easier to get accepted but much harder to stay in school. I knew many, many athletes and other students who flunked out. The graduation rate was a little over 50%, compared to 91% today. I believe I have read that athletes today are mentored, tutored, and supervised, in an effort to help those that are behind, keep up with other students to keep the graduation rates up. Not only that, but athletes are on full scholarships, and don't have to work 20 hours a week to retain their scholarships, as they did in the Cal basketball program of the 1950s.
Can I ask where you got that 91% rate?
Sure. I can't vouch for the accuracy, but this was the first thing that came up in my google search: https://www.univstats.com/colleges/university-of-california-berkeley/graduation-rate
Interesting. I wouldn't have guessed based on the drop out rate in many of my lower-division classes. I suppose those students could always just lessen their loads, stay in school, and graduate within 6 years (like many of my slacker fraternity brothers!). But that wouldn't explain why Cal was able to take on so many JC transfers when the upper-division classes were so much smaller. Then again that was 30 years ago (what, really?!).
BeachedBear
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Civil Bear said:

SFCityBear said:

Civil Bear said:

SFCityBear said:

rkt88edmo said:

SFCityBear said:


Beautifully written, and from the heart.

It makes me wonder why someone who writes this well would have trouble with academics at Cal, as was reported elsewhere, unless he was majoring in nuclear physics or something as challenging.

C'mon - you can't really judge academic capability from a 300 word blurb, no matter how well written. Especially having to balance all that stuff with being an athlete.

I only read stmts from student athletes leaving Cal, and this is by far the most heartfelt one. I wish he was able to turn the corner and get his playing time and a degree here.
You make some good points. I attended Cal in the 1960s, when it was much easier to get accepted but much harder to stay in school. I knew many, many athletes and other students who flunked out. The graduation rate was a little over 50%, compared to 91% today. I believe I have read that athletes today are mentored, tutored, and supervised, in an effort to help those that are behind, keep up with other students to keep the graduation rates up. Not only that, but athletes are on full scholarships, and don't have to work 20 hours a week to retain their scholarships, as they did in the Cal basketball program of the 1950s.
Can I ask where you got that 91% rate?
Sure. I can't vouch for the accuracy, but this was the first thing that came up in my google search: https://www.univstats.com/colleges/university-of-california-berkeley/graduation-rate
Interesting. I wouldn't have guessed based on the drop out rate in many of my lower-division classes. I suppose those students could always just lessen their loads, stay in school, and graduate within 6 years (like many of my slacker fraternity brothers!). But that wouldn't explain why Cal was able to take on so many JC transfers when the upper-division classes were so much smaller. Then again that was 30 years ago (what, really?!).
I'm of the same vintage as Civil Bear and I have three kids who went to college in the last decade (none of them at Cal, but all at other California Public institutions). Woowee - what a different college experience a generation can make. The level of student support infrastructure was just alarming. Part of my college experience was survival, adapting, navigating bureaucracy, etc. The non-teaching staffing levels that I observed was a clear indication why college costs are so much higher.

In the eighties, it was all about NOT FAILING. All my kids were good students, so they never were challenged, but they each shared stories of fellow students who were 'carried' to ensure their tuition checks kept coming. I have heard similar stories from Cal students at the same time, so it seems to have changed dramatically along with the rest.

Old way: Cheap and challening
New way: Expensive but easier

Only time will tell which method is better for the student and society. All my kids do seem much saner than I do (or did at their age).
SFCityBear
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Civil Bear said:

SFCityBear said:

Civil Bear said:

SFCityBear said:

rkt88edmo said:

SFCityBear said:


Beautifully written, and from the heart.

It makes me wonder why someone who writes this well would have trouble with academics at Cal, as was reported elsewhere, unless he was majoring in nuclear physics or something as challenging.

C'mon - you can't really judge academic capability from a 300 word blurb, no matter how well written. Especially having to balance all that stuff with being an athlete.

I only read stmts from student athletes leaving Cal, and this is by far the most heartfelt one. I wish he was able to turn the corner and get his playing time and a degree here.
You make some good points. I attended Cal in the 1960s, when it was much easier to get accepted but much harder to stay in school. I knew many, many athletes and other students who flunked out. The graduation rate was a little over 50%, compared to 91% today. I believe I have read that athletes today are mentored, tutored, and supervised, in an effort to help those that are behind, keep up with other students to keep the graduation rates up. Not only that, but athletes are on full scholarships, and don't have to work 20 hours a week to retain their scholarships, as they did in the Cal basketball program of the 1950s.
Can I ask where you got that 91% rate?
Sure. I can't vouch for the accuracy, but this was the first thing that came up in my google search: https://www.univstats.com/colleges/university-of-california-berkeley/graduation-rate
Interesting. I wouldn't have guessed based on the drop out rate in many of my lower-division classes. I suppose those students could always just lessen their loads, stay in school, and graduate within 6 years (like many of my slacker fraternity brothers!). But that wouldn't explain why Cal was able to take on so many JC transfers when the upper-division classes were so much smaller. Then again that was 30 years ago (what, really?!).
I did a little more poking around. It appears the 91% rate is the graduation rate for 6-year students, not 4-year students. If we can believe this article, the 6-year graduation rate was pretty steady at 50% for many years, and in the 1960s it began to rise to nearly 60% at the end of that decade. Since then, it appears to have been a fairly steady increase over time to the current high level. The article was written in 1999, and that graduation rate at 82% was presented as the highest ever recorded. It also shows very large increases in African-American graduation rates of 50% in 1982, to 71% in 1992. Latinos showed a similar increase. If you went to Cal 30 years ago, the 6-year graduation rate was around 80%, according to the article.

https://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/99legacy/3-11-1999.html

Here is a second article from Forbes, again showing the 91% rate for 6 year students, and also 76% for 4-years students (data from 2017-2018)

https://www.forbes.com/colleges/university-of-california-berkeley/#6083084d5bd4
oskidunker
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What, noDyson news?
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