California Drinking Song

68great
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The "Whiskey" thread posted on this board brought to mind a question:

Does anyone have any information on when the California Drinking Song was written, became commonly used on campus or in any living groups, who wrote it, did Cal copy it from another college.

This question came up when I saw a "B" movie made during or around WWII.
The star of the movie was a G.I. who was on leave in the U.S. He gets drunk and as he walks up the stairs of his/his girlfriend's/friend's apartment. He is singing a song that sounded A LOT like the California Drinking Song.
Adrian The Cal Bear
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Drinking_Song

""California Drinking Song" is a spirit song from the University of California, Berkeley. The first appearances of this song are traced to 1939. Both the UC Men's Octet and the University of California Marching Band perform it as part of their repertoire. It is a blend of other songs, including The Goddamned Dutch."
86Oski
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Adrian The Cal Bear;841973724 said:

...It is a blend of other songs, including The Goddamned Dutch."


Because there are only two things I can't stand in this world....

calumnus
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Adrian The Cal Bear;841973724 said:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Drinking_Song

""California Drinking Song" is a spirit song from the University of California, Berkeley. The first appearances of this song are traced to 1939. Both the UC Men's Octet and the University of California Marching Band perform it as part of their repertoire. It is a blend of other songs, including The Goddamned Dutch."


Actually, the core element of the song "For California, For California, the hills ring out the cry that we're out to do or die." first appeared in print in 1906 and was a modification of a copyrighted song that came out that same year "Oh Didn't he Ramble." As you can kind of get from the song, verses have been added over the years with the final being a blend of "no less than five different songs." The full version of the song appeared in 1939 after a trip down to L.A. (and a party in Newport?) for the UCLA game.
Quote:

The "California Drinking Song" is one of the most popular Cal songs among students and alumni everyone knows the words to this song! One of Cal's most unusual songs, over the years, no less than five different songs have been melded together to form today's current rendition. The core element of "California Drinking Song" is "Rambled," otherwise known as "California." The tune is based on the song "Oh, Didn't He Ramble," by Cole and Johnson (copyright 1906). The words were changed to what we know as "For California, for California, The hills send back the cry, We're out to do or die," and first appeared in printed form in 1906. The author of the text is unknown.

For a long time, the Band often played "Rambled" at football games, playing the chorus twice. When the "Drinking Song" element that follows was also played, it was known as "Rambled Into." In Roschelle Zella Paul's master thesis, "Song Tradition of the University of California at Berkeley," she mentions that "in 1939, the University Band and the Glee Club went down to Los Angeles for the UCLA vs. California football game. When they returned, both groups had joined additional verses of a whole new song to the old 'California' song. [Since then] even more verses have accumulated." The verses Paul refers to follow the "Rambled" part of "California Drinking Song." Titled "One More Drink for the Four of Us," this part of "California Drinking Song" is a traditional song of conviviality, sung throughout the United States (for example, Ohio State University has its own version of this song).

The origins of other elements of "California Drinking Song" are more difficult to pinpoint. It is believed that the "Speaking Start" (The steward went below,) is from a traditional Navy drinking song; the origins of the "Singing Start" (Oh, they had a little party down in Newport,) are unclear. "California Drinking Song" ends on a dominant seventh chord, which leaves a sense of unresolution. Consequently, the song beckons for additional lyrics which band members and students have been more than willing to supply. Many different versions currently circulate through campus. This song is often sung (with accompaniment) by the Band.
Calfans
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Do the students sing the drinking song?
JSC 76
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Calfans;841973993 said:

Do the students sing the drinking song?


After pretty much every home game, the Band leaves the stadium, marches to Bowles Hall, plays the Bowles Hall song, and then the Drinking Song. Students on the Bowles lawn sing along with both.
Adrian The Cal Bear
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Calfans;841973993 said:

Do the students sing the drinking song?


I only heard people from the Greek scene sing the drinking song when I was a student. Most Cal students dont really know it or care for it.
68great
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Calfans;841973993 said:

Do the students sing the drinking song?


Only after they turn 21. Other wise it would condone drinking by the underaged students. We know all Cal students abhor breaking the law, like those good little boys and girls in LA who stopped singing the Drinking Song when the WCTU equivalents in the 1920's objected on the grounds that it sanctioned drinking strong spirits.
:beer::rollinglaugh::beer:
Bears2thDoc
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It's the State Drinking Song.......

Cuz everybody knows the school's name is, "the University of California-Berkeley"
NYCGOBEARS
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Bears2thDoc;841974410 said:

It's the State Drinking Song.......

Cuz everybody knows the school's name is, "the University of California-Berkeley"

Have you seen the Whisky Thread? The song should be playing while reading that one.
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