There's plenty of blame to be shared on the lack of medical supplies

5,202 Views | 75 Replies | Last: 3 mo ago by BearChemist
bearlyamazing
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Not to excuse the Trump administration for not acting on it's part to correct the problem earlier but it's a long preexisting problem.

Los Angeles Times and Bloomberg News: Federal stockpile of N95 masks was depleted under Obama and never restocked

by Emma Colton
| March 23, 2020 10:23 AM

The national shortage of N95 respirator masks can be traced back to 2009 after the H1N1 swine flu pandemic, when the Obama administration was advised to replenish a national stockpile but did not, according to reports from Bloomberg News and the Los Angeles Times.

The Trump administration is scrambling to replenish a stockpile of protective medical gear for healthcare workers and patients as the coronavirus sweeps across the nation. N95 respirator masks are one of the most needed medical supplies amid the outbreak.

The George W. Bush administration published the National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza plan in 2005, which called on the federal government to distribute medical supplies from the Strategic National Stockpile governed by the Health and Human Services Department in the event of an outbreak.

In 2009, the H1N1 outbreak hit the United States, leading to 274,304 hospitalizations, 12,469 deaths, and a depletion of N95 respirator masks.
[url=https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/senate-judiciary-investigation-zeros-in-on-fbi-and-doj-officials-who-questioned-steele-dossier-sub-source?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=widget&utm_campaign=midarticle_rec][/url]
A federally backed task force and a safety equipment organization both recommended to the Obama administration that the stockpile be replenished with the 100 million masks used after the H1N1 outbreak.
Charles Johnson, president of the International Safety Equipment Association, said that advice was never heeded.

"Our association is unaware of any major effort to restore the stockpile to cover that drawdown," he said.
HHS Secretary Alex Azar reported last month that only 12 million N95 masks were available in the stockpile, "a tiny fraction of the 3.5 billion masks one of Azar's deputies later testified the nation's healthcare system would need," the Los Angeles Times noted.

Bloomberg News reported similar findings last week, noting, "After the H1N1 influenza outbreak in 2009, which triggered a nationwide shortage of masks and caused a 2- to 3-year backlog [of] orders for the N95 variety, the stockpile distributed about three-quarters of its inventory and didn't build back the supply."

Bloomberg reported that the Trump administration had asked construction companies to "donate their inventory of N95 masks to your local hospital and forgo additional orders of those industrial masks" and the Defense Department would provide 5 million N95 masks and 2,000 ventilators to help bridge the gap.
Johns Hopkins University's coronavirus tracker reported 35,225 confirmed COVID-19 cases in the U.S. as of Monday.

Vice President Mike Pence, who heads the administration's coronavirus task force, said on Sunday that a quarter-million people had been tested for the virus, with 9 out of 10 people testing negative.

"The FDA is working with manufacturers around the company to come up with faster, more innovative tests," he said.
dimitrig
How long do you want to ignore this user?

"The national shortage of N95 respirator masks can be traced back to 2009 after the H1N1 swine flu pandemic, when the Obama administration was advised to replenish a national stockpile but did not..."

Trump has been in office almost four years. Sounds like he had plenty of time to correct the problem if he thought it was a big mistake.

bearlyamazing
How long do you want to ignore this user?
dimitrig said:


"The national shortage of N95 respirator masks can be traced back to 2009 after the H1N1 swine flu pandemic, when the Obama administration was advised to replenish a national stockpile but did not..."

Trump has been in office almost four years. Sounds like he had plenty of time to correct the problem if he thought it was a big mistake.


See my title and my first sentence. I spread the blame, unlike many here or much of the media.
dimitrig
How long do you want to ignore this user?
bearlyamazing said:

dimitrig said:


"The national shortage of N95 respirator masks can be traced back to 2009 after the H1N1 swine flu pandemic, when the Obama administration was advised to replenish a national stockpile but did not..."

Trump has been in office almost four years. Sounds like he had plenty of time to correct the problem if he thought it was a big mistake.


See my title and my first sentence. I spread the blame, unlike many here or much of the media.
You are spreading the blame, but there is only one person to blame right now. That's Donald Trump, the President of the United States of America. If this was his first year in office I'd agree that spreading the blame is appropriate. However, he is almost through his full term of office. This isn't some complicated issue like Iraq that persisted across Administrations. It is far past time to blame the guy before him for a simple thing like a lack of masks - especially when Trump has done nothing but view organizations like NIH and CDC as a waste of money throughout his term.
golden sloth
How long do you want to ignore this user?
bearlyamazing said:

dimitrig said:


"The national shortage of N95 respirator masks can be traced back to 2009 after the H1N1 swine flu pandemic, when the Obama administration was advised to replenish a national stockpile but did not..."

Trump has been in office almost four years. Sounds like he had plenty of time to correct the problem if he thought it was a big mistake.


See my title and my first sentence. I spread the blame, unlike many here or much of the media.
I don't fault Trump for not replenishing the stockpile when there was no virus. I do fault him for not trying to stockpile or manufacture them once the disease started spreading in January.
bearlyamazing
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Only one person to blame? That's just silly.

This administration should've righted the lack of preparedness. No question. But to absolve SEVEN years of neglect from the Obama administration is just silly, especially after what they went through in his first year of office.

If you think for a second this administration will go through this pandemic and let supplies get low again, you're crazy.
golden sloth
How long do you want to ignore this user?
bearlyamazing said:

Only one person to blame? That's just silly.

This administration should've righted the lack of preparedness. No question. But to absolve SEVEN years of neglect from the Obama administration is just silly, especially after what they went through in his first year of office.

If you think for a second this administration will go through this pandemic and let supplies get low again, you're crazy.
Honestly, I think most administration's would let a supply get low again. Disaster preparedness is the thing you put off while you focus on the thiings you want to do or have to do.

Its generally a great thing for the government to invest in during a recession as you need to inject money into the economy, so you might as well acquire disaster supplies.
bearlyamazing
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Ventillators? Maybe. They're expensive. But masks and gloves? No excuse.
sycasey
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
sonofabear51
How long do you want to ignore this user?
tRump needs to learn how to apologize and actually take blame and responsibility. He has yet to do so. Done When that happens, maybe something will get done.
bearlyamazing
How long do you want to ignore this user?
sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
Um, really? H1NI?

Between the spring of 2009 and the spring of 2010, the virus infected as many as 1.4 billion people across the globe and killed between 151,700 and 575,400 people, according to the CDC.

Who was in office then? Did the experts tell him we didn't need to restock medical supplies that ran way down?

Come on, man.
dimitrig
How long do you want to ignore this user?
bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
Um, really? H1NI?

Between the spring of 2009 and the spring of 2010, the virus infected as many as 1.4 billion people across the globe and killed between 151,700 and 575,400 people, according to the CDC.

Who was in office then? Did the experts tell him we didn't need to restock medical supplies that ran way down?

Come on, man.

So when Trump took office he jumped right on it, right? Or did he spend his time attacking the NFL?
sycasey
How long do you want to ignore this user?
bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
Um, really? H1NI?

Between the spring of 2009 and the spring of 2010, the virus infected as many as 1.4 billion people across the globe and killed between 151,700 and 575,400 people, according to the CDC.

Who was in office then? Did the experts tell him we didn't need to restock medical supplies that ran way down?

Come on, man.
Please tell me when H1N1 threatened to overwhelm hospital capacity as COVID-19 did in China and Italy before coming to the United States.
bearlyamazing
How long do you want to ignore this user?
dimitrig said:

bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
Um, really? H1NI?

Between the spring of 2009 and the spring of 2010, the virus infected as many as 1.4 billion people across the globe and killed between 151,700 and 575,400 people, according to the CDC.

Who was in office then? Did the experts tell him we didn't need to restock medical supplies that ran way down?

Come on, man.

So when Trump took office he jumped right on it, right? Or did he spend his time attacking the NFL?
What are you not understanding? Read my thread title and first sentence in the OP.

Here I was just responding to his very incorrect assertion
sycasey
How long do you want to ignore this user?
bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
Um, really? H1NI?

Between the spring of 2009 and the spring of 2010, the virus infected as many as 1.4 billion people across the globe and killed between 151,700 and 575,400 people, according to the CDC.

Who was in office then? Did the experts tell him we didn't need to restock medical supplies that ran way down?

Come on, man.
Here's a link: https://www.livescience.com/covid-19-pandemic-vs-swine-flu.html


Quote:

How has the response been different?

There have been a few differences in the way the U.S. responded to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic compared with the nation's response to COVID-19 pandemic.

"A major difference in response is that we were better prepared for a pandemic (at least in the U.S.) years ago," Strathdee said.

At the beginning of both pandemics, the genetic sequences of the virus were released to the public with remarkable speed, so that countries could create diagnostic tests as soon as possible. On April 24, 2009, just nine days after initial detection of H1N1, the CDC uploaded genetic sequences of the virus to a public database and had already begun development of a vaccine. Similarly, on Jan. 12, 2020, five days after the novel coronavirus was isolated, Chinese scientists published the virus' genetic sequence.

But that's about where the similarities stop. Things haven't happened quite as fast or as smoothly with COVID-19 as they did with H1N1.

The first case of COVID-19 in the U.S was identified on Jan. 20, and the country's Department of Health and Human Services declared COVID-19 a public health emergency 11 days later, on Jan. 31. In contrast, the U.S. declared the swine flu a public health emergency just two days after the first confirmed U.S. case in 2009.

Within four weeks of detecting H1N1 in 2009, the CDC had begun releasing health supplies from their stockpile that could prevent and treat influenza, and most states in the U.S. had labs capable of diagnosing H1N1 without verification by a CDC test.

But diagnostic testing ran into significant hiccups when it came to COVID-19. On Feb. 5, the CDC began sending diagnostic kits for 2019-CoV-2 to about 100 public-health laboratories across the country. Most of the labs received faulty kits, which caused a major delay in combating the virus. Testing had to continue exclusively at the CDC headquarters until the agency could develop and send out replacement kits. This meant that COVID-19 continued to spread, undetected for weeks.

The FDA commissioner announced on Feb. 29 that the agency would allow labs across the country to begin testing for the novel coronavirus with their own lab-developed tests without prior approval, as long as the labs took basic steps to validate the tests and submitted an "emergency use authorization" (EUA) application within 15 days of the notice.

By March 10, seven weeks after the first confirmed case in the U.S., the CDC announced that 79 state and local health labs in the United States could test people for COVID-19. But some of those labs are already running out of supplies to run the tests.
Wow, looks like the government's response to a pandemic was much more swift and smooth under Obama than under Trump. Thanks for choosing an example that proves my point.
bearlyamazing
How long do you want to ignore this user?
sycasey said:

bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
Um, really? H1NI?

Between the spring of 2009 and the spring of 2010, the virus infected as many as 1.4 billion people across the globe and killed between 151,700 and 575,400 people, according to the CDC.

Who was in office then? Did the experts tell him we didn't need to restock medical supplies that ran way down?

Come on, man.
Here's a link: https://www.livescience.com/covid-19-pandemic-vs-swine-flu.html


Quote:

How has the response been different?

There have been a few differences in the way the U.S. responded to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic compared with the nation's response to COVID-19 pandemic.

"A major difference in response is that we were better prepared for a pandemic (at least in the U.S.) years ago," Strathdee said.

At the beginning of both pandemics, the genetic sequences of the virus were released to the public with remarkable speed, so that countries could create diagnostic tests as soon as possible. On April 24, 2009, just nine days after initial detection of H1N1, the CDC uploaded genetic sequences of the virus to a public database and had already begun development of a vaccine. Similarly, on Jan. 12, 2020, five days after the novel coronavirus was isolated, Chinese scientists published the virus' genetic sequence.

But that's about where the similarities stop. Things haven't happened quite as fast or as smoothly with COVID-19 as they did with H1N1.

The first case of COVID-19 in the U.S was identified on Jan. 20, and the country's Department of Health and Human Services declared COVID-19 a public health emergency 11 days later, on Jan. 31. In contrast, the U.S. declared the swine flu a public health emergency just two days after the first confirmed U.S. case in 2009.

Within four weeks of detecting H1N1 in 2009, the CDC had begun releasing health supplies from their stockpile that could prevent and treat influenza, and most states in the U.S. had labs capable of diagnosing H1N1 without verification by a CDC test.

But diagnostic testing ran into significant hiccups when it came to COVID-19. On Feb. 5, the CDC began sending diagnostic kits for 2019-CoV-2 to about 100 public-health laboratories across the country. Most of the labs received faulty kits, which caused a major delay in combating the virus. Testing had to continue exclusively at the CDC headquarters until the agency could develop and send out replacement kits. This meant that COVID-19 continued to spread, undetected for weeks.

The FDA commissioner announced on Feb. 29 that the agency would allow labs across the country to begin testing for the novel coronavirus with their own lab-developed tests without prior approval, as long as the labs took basic steps to validate the tests and submitted an "emergency use authorization" (EUA) application within 15 days of the notice.

By March 10, seven weeks after the first confirmed case in the U.S., the CDC announced that 79 state and local health labs in the United States could test people for COVID-19. But some of those labs are already running out of supplies to run the tests.
Wow, looks like the government's response to a pandemic was much more swift and smooth under Obama than under Trump. Thanks for choosing an example that proves my point.
Number one, there wasn't the type of shortage of masks and tests that there are now (my original point). Secondly, as the article noted, this is a harder virus to fight.

Why can't you acknowledge that the Obama administration failed in a big way to restock supplies and prepare for the next pandemic just like the Trump administration failed in a big way to not up preparedness when he took office? Is that so hard?
going4roses
How long do you want to ignore this user?
i guess somebody needed to feel good...

this about the system that reproduces the dynamic of a person/life having a price






wifeisafurd
How long do you want to ignore this user?
bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
Um, really? H1NI?

Between the spring of 2009 and the spring of 2010, the virus infected as many as 1.4 billion people across the globe and killed between 151,700 and 575,400 people, according to the CDC.

Who was in office then? Did the experts tell him we didn't need to restock medical supplies that ran way down?

Come on, man.
Here's a link: https://www.livescience.com/covid-19-pandemic-vs-swine-flu.html


Quote:

How has the response been different?

There have been a few differences in the way the U.S. responded to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic compared with the nation's response to COVID-19 pandemic.

"A major difference in response is that we were better prepared for a pandemic (at least in the U.S.) years ago," Strathdee said.

At the beginning of both pandemics, the genetic sequences of the virus were released to the public with remarkable speed, so that countries could create diagnostic tests as soon as possible. On April 24, 2009, just nine days after initial detection of H1N1, the CDC uploaded genetic sequences of the virus to a public database and had already begun development of a vaccine. Similarly, on Jan. 12, 2020, five days after the novel coronavirus was isolated, Chinese scientists published the virus' genetic sequence.

But that's about where the similarities stop. Things haven't happened quite as fast or as smoothly with COVID-19 as they did with H1N1.

The first case of COVID-19 in the U.S was identified on Jan. 20, and the country's Department of Health and Human Services declared COVID-19 a public health emergency 11 days later, on Jan. 31. In contrast, the U.S. declared the swine flu a public health emergency just two days after the first confirmed U.S. case in 2009.

Within four weeks of detecting H1N1 in 2009, the CDC had begun releasing health supplies from their stockpile that could prevent and treat influenza, and most states in the U.S. had labs capable of diagnosing H1N1 without verification by a CDC test.

But diagnostic testing ran into significant hiccups when it came to COVID-19. On Feb. 5, the CDC began sending diagnostic kits for 2019-CoV-2 to about 100 public-health laboratories across the country. Most of the labs received faulty kits, which caused a major delay in combating the virus. Testing had to continue exclusively at the CDC headquarters until the agency could develop and send out replacement kits. This meant that COVID-19 continued to spread, undetected for weeks.

The FDA commissioner announced on Feb. 29 that the agency would allow labs across the country to begin testing for the novel coronavirus with their own lab-developed tests without prior approval, as long as the labs took basic steps to validate the tests and submitted an "emergency use authorization" (EUA) application within 15 days of the notice.

By March 10, seven weeks after the first confirmed case in the U.S., the CDC announced that 79 state and local health labs in the United States could test people for COVID-19. But some of those labs are already running out of supplies to run the tests.
Wow, looks like the government's response to a pandemic was much more swift and smooth under Obama than under Trump. Thanks for choosing an example that proves my point.
the article noted, this is a harder virus to fight.


I'm not sure the article is even close to correct. The CDC reported an estimated 50 million Americans or 1 in 6 people had been infected with the 2009 A H1N1 Virus and 10,000 Americans had died. Right now the numbers are no where near that for COVID 19. More like 46K confirmed cases, and around 600 deaths. Admittedly testing sucks, and the numbers of confirmed cases will rise significantly and the mortality rare will go down.
BearForce2
How long do you want to ignore this user?
dimitrig said:

bearlyamazing said:

dimitrig said:


"The national shortage of N95 respirator masks can be traced back to 2009 after the H1N1 swine flu pandemic, when the Obama administration was advised to replenish a national stockpile but did not..."

Trump has been in office almost four years. Sounds like he had plenty of time to correct the problem if he thought it was a big mistake.


See my title and my first sentence. I spread the blame, unlike many here or much of the media.
You are spreading the blame, but there is only one person to blame right now. That's Donald Trump, the President of the United States of America. If this was his first year in office I'd agree that spreading the blame is appropriate. However, he is almost through his full term of office. This isn't some complicated issue like Iraq that persisted across Administrations. It is far past time to blame the guy before him for a simple thing like a lack of masks - especially when Trump has done nothing but view organizations like NIH and CDC as a waste of money throughout his term.

If seems to me if your toilet broke you would find a way to blame the President.
BearForce2
How long do you want to ignore this user?
sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
And Obama's experts told him they were angry at a youtube video.
okaydo
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Remember when h1n1 was a big issue during the 2012 election?
oski003
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Does anybody know if the government (state or federal) is actually getting testing kits? What is the ETA? Don't we need them if we want to eventually stop mass quarantines? I was wrong earlier when I thought they were available weeks ago.
Cal88
How long do you want to ignore this user?
sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
On January 14th, this is what the experts at the WHO were saying:



The WHO also only declared that covid19 was a world pandemic on March 11. Three months after the epidemic started growing in Wuhan.

The experts in the US have also been saying that masks were ineffective for the general public, a notion that's laughable to any schoolboy in east Asia.


When Obama was faced with a serious crisis in 2008, the experts in his administration blew out the debt and bailed out their buddies at the taxpayers expense, and no one was ever prosecuted.

Obama expanded GWB's military interventionism in the middle east by pushing for regime change and actively feeding wars in Libya, Syria and Yemen, as well as overseeing the overthrow of democratically elected government in Central America (Honduras), which fed the migrant crisis.

Obama is a slick politician who can do no wrong according to his constituency, the spell he has on his constituency is very similar to the one Reagan had on his base. I'm not sure that people like Joe Biden, Susan Rice, Rahm Emmanuel would have been on top of this crisis.
calpoly
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Cal88 said:

sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
On January 14th, this is what the experts at the WHO were saying:



The WHO also only declared that covid19 was a world pandemic on March 11. Three months after the epidemic started growing in Wuhan.

The experts in the US have also been saying that masks were ineffective for the general public, a notion that's laughable to any schoolboy in east Asia.


When Obama was faced with a serious crisis in 2008, the experts in his administration blew out the debt and bailed out their buddies at the taxpayers expense, and no one was ever prosecuted.

Obama expanded GWB's military interventionism in the middle east by pushing for regime change and actively feeding wars in Libya, Syria and Yemen, as well as overseeing the overthrow of democratically elected government in Central America (Honduras), which fed the migrant crisis.

Obama is a slick politician who can do no wrong according to his constituency, the spell he has on his constituency is very similar to the one Reagan had on his base. I'm not sure that people like Joe Biden, Susan Rice, Rahm Emmanuel would have been on top of this crisis.
Please do not try to rewrite history. The crisis started in 2008 when bush was president. In addition, it was bush that started the bailout of the buddies on Oct 3, 2008.
bearister
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Cal88, I'm not much of a lover of politicians so I have nothin' back at you....but psychologically, it would sure help the medicine go down easier to have a slick PR guy with some grey matter right now instead of a hate filled divisive moron with a D minus bench and supporters that mirror his qualities. My instinct, however, tells me that Governor Newsom is doing a better job managing this crisis in California than POTUS is on the national level.
Cancel my subscription to the Resurrection
Send my credentials to the House of Detention
I got some friends inside
OaktownBear
How long do you want to ignore this user?
bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
Um, really? H1NI?

Between the spring of 2009 and the spring of 2010, the virus infected as many as 1.4 billion people across the globe and killed between 151,700 and 575,400 people, according to the CDC.

Who was in office then? Did the experts tell him we didn't need to restock medical supplies that ran way down?

Come on, man.
Here's a link: https://www.livescience.com/covid-19-pandemic-vs-swine-flu.html


Quote:

How has the response been different?

There have been a few differences in the way the U.S. responded to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic compared with the nation's response to COVID-19 pandemic.

"A major difference in response is that we were better prepared for a pandemic (at least in the U.S.) years ago," Strathdee said.

At the beginning of both pandemics, the genetic sequences of the virus were released to the public with remarkable speed, so that countries could create diagnostic tests as soon as possible. On April 24, 2009, just nine days after initial detection of H1N1, the CDC uploaded genetic sequences of the virus to a public database and had already begun development of a vaccine. Similarly, on Jan. 12, 2020, five days after the novel coronavirus was isolated, Chinese scientists published the virus' genetic sequence.

But that's about where the similarities stop. Things haven't happened quite as fast or as smoothly with COVID-19 as they did with H1N1.

The first case of COVID-19 in the U.S was identified on Jan. 20, and the country's Department of Health and Human Services declared COVID-19 a public health emergency 11 days later, on Jan. 31. In contrast, the U.S. declared the swine flu a public health emergency just two days after the first confirmed U.S. case in 2009.

Within four weeks of detecting H1N1 in 2009, the CDC had begun releasing health supplies from their stockpile that could prevent and treat influenza, and most states in the U.S. had labs capable of diagnosing H1N1 without verification by a CDC test.

But diagnostic testing ran into significant hiccups when it came to COVID-19. On Feb. 5, the CDC began sending diagnostic kits for 2019-CoV-2 to about 100 public-health laboratories across the country. Most of the labs received faulty kits, which caused a major delay in combating the virus. Testing had to continue exclusively at the CDC headquarters until the agency could develop and send out replacement kits. This meant that COVID-19 continued to spread, undetected for weeks.

The FDA commissioner announced on Feb. 29 that the agency would allow labs across the country to begin testing for the novel coronavirus with their own lab-developed tests without prior approval, as long as the labs took basic steps to validate the tests and submitted an "emergency use authorization" (EUA) application within 15 days of the notice.

By March 10, seven weeks after the first confirmed case in the U.S., the CDC announced that 79 state and local health labs in the United States could test people for COVID-19. But some of those labs are already running out of supplies to run the tests.
Wow, looks like the government's response to a pandemic was much more swift and smooth under Obama than under Trump. Thanks for choosing an example that proves my point.
Number one, there wasn't the type of shortage of masks and tests that there are now (my original point). Secondly, as the article noted, this is a harder virus to fight.

Why can't you acknowledge that the Obama administration failed in a big way to restock supplies and prepare for the next pandemic just like the Trump administration failed in a big way to not up preparedness when he took office? Is that so hard?
It is like this. When a coach in his fourth season has a losing record, everyone blames the coach. If the coach or his fans then point out that the last coach had losing records and recruited poorly, there is only one reason to do it. To deflect blame from the current coach and get everyone talking about the past coach even if it is to argue over whether that coach was bad or good. Talking about the prior coach in the fourth season is irrelevant. Could the prior coach have done a better job? Maybe. It isn't relevant anymore. I ripped into Sonny Dykes. Whatever happens this year is on Justin Wilcox. Talking about Sonny Dykes would only distract from the question of how Wilcox is performing.

I don't blame Trump personally for not having medical supplies built up by last December. I doubt the issue even crossed his desk. I do blame him for not responding as soon as the issue cropped up. I do blame him for not building up supplies for 2 and a half months. If he wants to know who is to blame for the economy tanking during social distancing measures he can look in the mirror because one of the main reasons we have to social distance to such a severe and long extent is to allow our testing capacity and our healthcare system to get up and running so they can prevent spread as South Korea has.

Every day since early January that we have not been producing necessary supplies and getting prepared is on him. Every day that he and his political allies were minimizing the threat to the public is on him. February 25 Mardi Gras with 1.4million people in New Orleans and now New Orleans having the fastest increase in new cases in the world is on him. Had he jumped on everything right away and was running behind because he was left with depleted supplies, you can talk. He didn't. The bottom line is that any problem Obama left him could have been resolved with early action.

When this is all over, you want to talk about how prior administrations should have increased preparedness, fine. Right now, it is on Trump. Producing masks is not exactly difficult. Could have made a lot of masks in two months.
Unit2Sucks
How long do you want to ignore this user?
The article isn't wrong to point out that there were deficiencies to the national stockpile for equipment, and in any other number of areas, but Obama isn't in a position to do anything about it, so why bother whinging about it now?

We have been told by Trump that he is the sole decision maker and that he doesn't need any advisors. Accordingly, it's his sole responsibility to create an appropriate response to this pandemic (which he also recently said he knew was a pandemic before anyone started calling it one). Of course, he's also said he takes no responsibility for anything. He's a perfect republican - he believes everyone else should have personal responsibility so he doesn't have to.

Of course, he's the same moron who said $8B was too much money to stop this virus and that even $2.5B was too much. Now he's begging for $2T in stimulus (and it may be as much as $6T with Fed injections). Boy, $8B sure sounds cheap to me, but of course it wouldn't have mattered since the moron couldn't have marshalled resources to help this country because he only thinks about adulation and his own short-term interests.

I'll make all you RNWJs a deal - if we can have Obama back as President, you can blame him for everything. Until such time as Obama is president, this is all on Trump and he needs to fix it.
OaktownBear
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Cal88 said:

sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
On January 14th, this is what the experts at the WHO were saying:



The WHO also only declared that covid19 was a world pandemic on March 11. Three months after the epidemic started growing in Wuhan.

The experts in the US have also been saying that masks were ineffective for the general public, a notion that's laughable to any schoolboy in east Asia.


When Obama was faced with a serious crisis in 2008, the experts in his administration blew out the debt and bailed out their buddies at the taxpayers expense, and no one was ever prosecuted.

Obama expanded GWB's military interventionism in the middle east by pushing for regime change and actively feeding wars in Libya, Syria and Yemen, as well as overseeing the overthrow of democratically elected government in Central America (Honduras), which fed the migrant crisis.

Obama is a slick politician who can do no wrong according to his constituency, the spell he has on his constituency is very similar to the one Reagan had on his base. I'm not sure that people like Joe Biden, Susan Rice, Rahm Emmanuel would have been on top of this crisis.
TARP was started under Bush, expanded under Obama and did not hurt the debt because ultimately it paid for itself. And at least he ran deficits in an attempt to get the economy out of recession vs. running deficits in times of prosperity.

I don't care when the WHO literally declared covid19 a world pandemic. I can certainly criticize their behavior, but at the end of the day, they are not a US organization and they are not beholding to the US voter. US intelligence sounded the alarms in January. Other than insider trading, nothing was done. Trump is certainly not the only leader to fail in response - many did. He is ours though and subject to our judgment.
heartofthebear
How long do you want to ignore this user?
OaktownBear said:

bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
Um, really? H1NI?

Between the spring of 2009 and the spring of 2010, the virus infected as many as 1.4 billion people across the globe and killed between 151,700 and 575,400 people, according to the CDC.

Who was in office then? Did the experts tell him we didn't need to restock medical supplies that ran way down?

Come on, man.
Here's a link: https://www.livescience.com/covid-19-pandemic-vs-swine-flu.html


Quote:

How has the response been different?

There have been a few differences in the way the U.S. responded to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic compared with the nation's response to COVID-19 pandemic.

"A major difference in response is that we were better prepared for a pandemic (at least in the U.S.) years ago," Strathdee said.

At the beginning of both pandemics, the genetic sequences of the virus were released to the public with remarkable speed, so that countries could create diagnostic tests as soon as possible. On April 24, 2009, just nine days after initial detection of H1N1, the CDC uploaded genetic sequences of the virus to a public database and had already begun development of a vaccine. Similarly, on Jan. 12, 2020, five days after the novel coronavirus was isolated, Chinese scientists published the virus' genetic sequence.

But that's about where the similarities stop. Things haven't happened quite as fast or as smoothly with COVID-19 as they did with H1N1.

The first case of COVID-19 in the U.S was identified on Jan. 20, and the country's Department of Health and Human Services declared COVID-19 a public health emergency 11 days later, on Jan. 31. In contrast, the U.S. declared the swine flu a public health emergency just two days after the first confirmed U.S. case in 2009.

Within four weeks of detecting H1N1 in 2009, the CDC had begun releasing health supplies from their stockpile that could prevent and treat influenza, and most states in the U.S. had labs capable of diagnosing H1N1 without verification by a CDC test.

But diagnostic testing ran into significant hiccups when it came to COVID-19. On Feb. 5, the CDC began sending diagnostic kits for 2019-CoV-2 to about 100 public-health laboratories across the country. Most of the labs received faulty kits, which caused a major delay in combating the virus. Testing had to continue exclusively at the CDC headquarters until the agency could develop and send out replacement kits. This meant that COVID-19 continued to spread, undetected for weeks.

The FDA commissioner announced on Feb. 29 that the agency would allow labs across the country to begin testing for the novel coronavirus with their own lab-developed tests without prior approval, as long as the labs took basic steps to validate the tests and submitted an "emergency use authorization" (EUA) application within 15 days of the notice.

By March 10, seven weeks after the first confirmed case in the U.S., the CDC announced that 79 state and local health labs in the United States could test people for COVID-19. But some of those labs are already running out of supplies to run the tests.
Wow, looks like the government's response to a pandemic was much more swift and smooth under Obama than under Trump. Thanks for choosing an example that proves my point.
Number one, there wasn't the type of shortage of masks and tests that there are now (my original point). Secondly, as the article noted, this is a harder virus to fight.

Why can't you acknowledge that the Obama administration failed in a big way to restock supplies and prepare for the next pandemic just like the Trump administration failed in a big way to not up preparedness when he took office? Is that so hard?
It is like this. When a coach in his fourth season has a losing record, everyone blames the coach. If the coach or his fans then point out that the last coach had losing records and recruited poorly, there is only one reason to do it. To deflect blame from the current coach and get everyone talking about the past coach even if it is to argue over whether that coach was bad or good. Talking about the prior coach in the fourth season is irrelevant. Could the prior coach have done a better job? Maybe. It isn't relevant anymore. I ripped into Sonny Dykes. Whatever happens this year is on Justin Wilcox. Talking about Sonny Dykes would only distract from the question of how Wilcox is performing.

I don't blame Trump personally for not having medical supplies built up by last December. I doubt the issue even crossed his desk. I do blame him for not responding as soon as the issue cropped up. I do blame him for not building up supplies for 2 and a half months. If he wants to know who is to blame for the economy tanking during social distancing measures he can look in the mirror because one of the main reasons we have to social distance to such a severe and long extent is to allow our testing capacity and our healthcare system to get up and running so they can prevent spread as South Korea has.

Every day since early January that we have not been producing necessary supplies and getting prepared is on him. Every day that he and his political allies were minimizing the threat to the public is on him. February 25 Mardi Gras with 1.4million people in New Orleans and now New Orleans having the fastest increase in new cases in the world is on him. Had he jumped on everything right away and was running behind because he was left with depleted supplies, you can talk. He didn't. The bottom line is that any problem Obama left him could have been resolved with early action.

When this is all over, you want to talk about how prior administrations should have increased preparedness, fine. Right now, it is on Trump. Producing masks is not exactly difficult. Could have made a lot of masks in two months.
Right now New York health care professionals are desperately short of critical medical supplies, specifically N95 masks and ventilators. In one week, New York will have to start making decisions that they made in Italy, who lives and who dies. While bearlyamazing tries to decide who to blame, New York has to decide who lives and all of this is happening while Trump refuses to execute the directive that he already authorized, the defense production act, which allows the federal government to retool industry for the purpose of producing supplies in response to the needs of the nation during a national emergency. Trump is delaying the execution of that because he is concerned that it might be a bit nationalistic and America is not a nationalistic country. Trump claimed that those supplies aren't needed because industry has volunteered to help. Tell that to Governor Cuomo. He is livid.

Bearlyamazing, do the families of the people waiting to die in New York care that Obama was to blame before or are they more concerned that the current president do what he is not doing now!
sycasey
How long do you want to ignore this user?
OaktownBear said:

bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

bearlyamazing said:

sycasey said:

Here's the thing: I would bet a lot of money that if a pandemic like this got started with Obama as President, he would have already gotten started with mass production of medical supplies. It probably would have already been going on for a month now at least.

Obama listened to experts.
Um, really? H1NI?

Between the spring of 2009 and the spring of 2010, the virus infected as many as 1.4 billion people across the globe and killed between 151,700 and 575,400 people, according to the CDC.

Who was in office then? Did the experts tell him we didn't need to restock medical supplies that ran way down?

Come on, man.
Here's a link: https://www.livescience.com/covid-19-pandemic-vs-swine-flu.html


Quote:

How has the response been different?

There have been a few differences in the way the U.S. responded to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic compared with the nation's response to COVID-19 pandemic.

"A major difference in response is that we were better prepared for a pandemic (at least in the U.S.) years ago," Strathdee said.

At the beginning of both pandemics, the genetic sequences of the virus were released to the public with remarkable speed, so that countries could create diagnostic tests as soon as possible. On April 24, 2009, just nine days after initial detection of H1N1, the CDC uploaded genetic sequences of the virus to a public database and had already begun development of a vaccine. Similarly, on Jan. 12, 2020, five days after the novel coronavirus was isolated, Chinese scientists published the virus' genetic sequence.

But that's about where the similarities stop. Things haven't happened quite as fast or as smoothly with COVID-19 as they did with H1N1.

The first case of COVID-19 in the U.S was identified on Jan. 20, and the country's Department of Health and Human Services declared COVID-19 a public health emergency 11 days later, on Jan. 31. In contrast, the U.S. declared the swine flu a public health emergency just two days after the first confirmed U.S. case in 2009.

Within four weeks of detecting H1N1 in 2009, the CDC had begun releasing health supplies from their stockpile that could prevent and treat influenza, and most states in the U.S. had labs capable of diagnosing H1N1 without verification by a CDC test.

But diagnostic testing ran into significant hiccups when it came to COVID-19. On Feb. 5, the CDC began sending diagnostic kits for 2019-CoV-2 to about 100 public-health laboratories across the country. Most of the labs received faulty kits, which caused a major delay in combating the virus. Testing had to continue exclusively at the CDC headquarters until the agency could develop and send out replacement kits. This meant that COVID-19 continued to spread, undetected for weeks.

The FDA commissioner announced on Feb. 29 that the agency would allow labs across the country to begin testing for the novel coronavirus with their own lab-developed tests without prior approval, as long as the labs took basic steps to validate the tests and submitted an "emergency use authorization" (EUA) application within 15 days of the notice.

By March 10, seven weeks after the first confirmed case in the U.S., the CDC announced that 79 state and local health labs in the United States could test people for COVID-19. But some of those labs are already running out of supplies to run the tests.
Wow, looks like the government's response to a pandemic was much more swift and smooth under Obama than under Trump. Thanks for choosing an example that proves my point.
Number one, there wasn't the type of shortage of masks and tests that there are now (my original point). Secondly, as the article noted, this is a harder virus to fight.

Why can't you acknowledge that the Obama administration failed in a big way to restock supplies and prepare for the next pandemic just like the Trump administration failed in a big way to not up preparedness when he took office? Is that so hard?
It is like this. When a coach in his fourth season has a losing record, everyone blames the coach. If the coach or his fans then point out that the last coach had losing records and recruited poorly, there is only one reason to do it. To deflect blame from the current coach and get everyone talking about the past coach even if it is to argue over whether that coach was bad or good. Talking about the prior coach in the fourth season is irrelevant. Could the prior coach have done a better job? Maybe. It isn't relevant anymore. I ripped into Sonny Dykes. Whatever happens this year is on Justin Wilcox. Talking about Sonny Dykes would only distract from the question of how Wilcox is performing.
Completely agreed. Though I would say it's even dumber to make this argument when the previous coach actually had a better record.

Note that I did not say a PERFECT record. Not undefeated. But still better.
bearister
How long do you want to ignore this user?
OaktownBear, you continue to impress me.




*Why did the Mods change how you edit, quote, etc. during a pandemic? I need the comfort of old reliable ways.
Cancel my subscription to the Resurrection
Send my credentials to the House of Detention
I got some friends inside
Eastern Oregon Bear
How long do you want to ignore this user?
oski003 said:

Does anybody know if the government (state or federal) is actually getting testing kits? What is the ETA? Don't we need them if we want to eventually stop mass quarantines? I was wrong earlier when I thought they were available weeks ago.
Out here in the boonies, my doctor was quoted in the local news a few days ago that you have a better chance of finding toilet paper at the supermarket than getting tested for the coronavirus. We had someone sick here in my area on March 1st and a family member tested positive a couple of days later. Since then, 3 weeks of no new cases. What are the chances of that being accurate?
Professor Harold Hill
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Unit2Sucks said:

The article isn't wrong to point out that there were deficiencies to the national stockpile for equipment, and in any other number of areas, but Obama isn't in a position to do anything about it, so why bother whinging about it now?

We have been told by Trump that he is the sole decision maker and that he doesn't need any advisors. Accordingly, it's his sole responsibility to create an appropriate response to this pandemic (which he also recently said he knew was a pandemic before anyone started calling it one). Of course, he's also said he takes no responsibility for anything. He's a perfect republican - he believes everyone else should have personal responsibility so he doesn't have to.

Of course, he's the same moron who said $8B was too much money to stop this virus and that even $2.5B was too much. Now he's begging for $2T in stimulus (and it may be as much as $6T with Fed injections). Boy, $8B sure sounds cheap to me, but of course it wouldn't have mattered since the moron couldn't have marshalled resources to help this country because he only thinks about adulation and his own short-term interests.

I'll make all you RNWJs a deal - if we can have Obama back as President, you can blame him for everything. Until such time as Obama is president, this is all on Trump and he needs to fix it.
The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing RWNJ's that a moderate Republican president was the devil because he was black and had a Muslim sounding name and that the only way to save us from him was electing the devil.
Professor Harold Hill
How long do you want to ignore this user?
bearister said:

*Why did the Mods change how you edit, quote, etc. during a pandemic? I need the comfort of old reliable ways.
What changed?
OaktownBear
How long do you want to ignore this user?
oski003 said:

Does anybody know if the government (state or federal) is actually getting testing kits? What is the ETA? Don't we need them if we want to eventually stop mass quarantines? I was wrong earlier when I thought they were available weeks ago.
1. Absolutely we need them to stop mass quarantines. Well, at least we need them to stop mass quarantines intelligently. We can stupidly stop mass quarantines any time we want.

2. My understanding is it is not just the kits. We are low on masks to keep health providers safe while doing the testing. And our labs are critically low on the reagents necessary to read the tests (and that is why it is taking sometimes a long time to get results.) Because of all this, even if they have kits, they are essentially rationing for only highest priority. We need to produce masks, kits, and the chemicals necessary to process them.

The testing has been a cluster eff.
Page 1 of 3
 
×
subscribe Verify your student status
See Subscription Benefits
Trial only available to users who have never subscribed or participated in a previous trial.