Vaccine Redux - Vax up and go to Class

59,337 Views | 1793 Replies | Last: 4 hrs ago by BearForce2
oski003
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Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

https://twitter.com/I7Bomb/status/1450203773721358341?t=BWlJ9mXXZRGz9CqLhDvUFw&s=19

Senator Ron Johnson accuses FDA of being in bed with big pharma, ignoring inexpensive treatments and vaccine VAERS data.
I didn't realize this was the thread where we post stupid things that Ron Johnson believes.

Here's one:
Quote:

I absolutely do not believe in the science of man-caused climate change," Johnson said. "It's not proven by any stretch of the imagination."

Johnson, in an interview last month, described believers in manmade causes of climate change as "crazy" and the theory as "lunacy."

"It's far more likely that it's just sunspot activity or just something in the geologic eons of time," he said.
Excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere "gets sucked down by trees and helps the trees grow," said Johnson.

Average Earth temperatures were relatively warm during the Middle Ages, Johnson said, and "it's not like there were tons of cars on the road."

He said he disagreed with any government spending to try to address global warming. A strong economy is the best way to preserve a good environment, Johnson said.




We are allowed to post something a senator says on the news even if some positions he holds seem crazy.
Yes, we are all aware that you will post every anti-vax view you can find. Johnson is a long-time anti-vaxxer and anti-science moron. In your parlance he seems to qualify as a real "scumbag".

He's one of the idiots who thought the Foxconn deal was good for Wisconsin lol
Quote:

"Today's groundbreaking is the start of an exciting chapter for southeastern Wisconsin. Not only will our state benefit from the jobs created directly at Foxconn, but also indirectly throughout the economy. I want to congratulate President Trump, Gov. Walker and Speaker Ryan for the commitment and vision to make this possible."
Give him a week and he'll have some other idiotic position. He still criticizes Harris for questioning the vaccines last year even though he now holds the exact same position he's accusing her of having held!
I don't post all the anti-vax views I can find, cupcake.

For example, I held back on this one. Nonetheless, I shall post it.



Australian Navy Stats:

In 31 years there have been 317 cases of myocarditis in service personnel.

This year, up to 28th September 2021, there have been 1,113 cases of myocarditis.


USucks Conclusion: the Australian Navy is full of anti-vaxxers faking myocarditis and oski003 is an anti-vaxxer for not posting how mild myocarditis is.
sycasey
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Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

https://twitter.com/I7Bomb/status/1450203773721358341?t=BWlJ9mXXZRGz9CqLhDvUFw&s=19

Senator Ron Johnson accuses FDA of being in bed with big pharma, ignoring inexpensive treatments and vaccine VAERS data.
I didn't realize this was the thread where we post stupid things that Ron Johnson believes.

Here's one:
Quote:

I absolutely do not believe in the science of man-caused climate change," Johnson said. "It's not proven by any stretch of the imagination."

Johnson, in an interview last month, described believers in manmade causes of climate change as "crazy" and the theory as "lunacy."

"It's far more likely that it's just sunspot activity or just something in the geologic eons of time," he said.
Excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere "gets sucked down by trees and helps the trees grow," said Johnson.

Average Earth temperatures were relatively warm during the Middle Ages, Johnson said, and "it's not like there were tons of cars on the road."

He said he disagreed with any government spending to try to address global warming. A strong economy is the best way to preserve a good environment, Johnson said.




We are allowed to post something a senator says on the news even if some positions he holds seem crazy.
Yes, we are all aware that you will post every anti-vax view you can find. Johnson is a long-time anti-vaxxer and anti-science moron. In your parlance he seems to qualify as a real "scumbag".

He's one of the idiots who thought the Foxconn deal was good for Wisconsin lol
Quote:

"Today's groundbreaking is the start of an exciting chapter for southeastern Wisconsin. Not only will our state benefit from the jobs created directly at Foxconn, but also indirectly throughout the economy. I want to congratulate President Trump, Gov. Walker and Speaker Ryan for the commitment and vision to make this possible."
Give him a week and he'll have some other idiotic position. He still criticizes Harris for questioning the vaccines last year even though he now holds the exact same position he's accusing her of having held!
It's pretty clear that Ron Johnson believes whatever is politically expedient for him.
Unit2Sucks
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oski003 said:

Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

https://twitter.com/I7Bomb/status/1450203773721358341?t=BWlJ9mXXZRGz9CqLhDvUFw&s=19

Senator Ron Johnson accuses FDA of being in bed with big pharma, ignoring inexpensive treatments and vaccine VAERS data.
I didn't realize this was the thread where we post stupid things that Ron Johnson believes.

Here's one:
Quote:

I absolutely do not believe in the science of man-caused climate change," Johnson said. "It's not proven by any stretch of the imagination."

Johnson, in an interview last month, described believers in manmade causes of climate change as "crazy" and the theory as "lunacy."

"It's far more likely that it's just sunspot activity or just something in the geologic eons of time," he said.
Excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere "gets sucked down by trees and helps the trees grow," said Johnson.

Average Earth temperatures were relatively warm during the Middle Ages, Johnson said, and "it's not like there were tons of cars on the road."

He said he disagreed with any government spending to try to address global warming. A strong economy is the best way to preserve a good environment, Johnson said.




We are allowed to post something a senator says on the news even if some positions he holds seem crazy.
Yes, we are all aware that you will post every anti-vax view you can find. Johnson is a long-time anti-vaxxer and anti-science moron. In your parlance he seems to qualify as a real "scumbag".

He's one of the idiots who thought the Foxconn deal was good for Wisconsin lol
Quote:

"Today's groundbreaking is the start of an exciting chapter for southeastern Wisconsin. Not only will our state benefit from the jobs created directly at Foxconn, but also indirectly throughout the economy. I want to congratulate President Trump, Gov. Walker and Speaker Ryan for the commitment and vision to make this possible."
Give him a week and he'll have some other idiotic position. He still criticizes Harris for questioning the vaccines last year even though he now holds the exact same position he's accusing her of having held!
I don't post all the anti-vax views I can find, cupcake.

For example, I held back on this one. Nonetheless, I shall post it.



Australian Navy Stats:

In 31 years there have been 317 cases of myocarditis in service personnel.

This year, up to 28th September 2021, there have been 1,113 cases of myocarditis.


USucks Conclusion: the Australian Navy is full of anti-vaxxers faking myocarditis and oski003 is an anti-vaxxer for not posting how mild myocarditis is.
See, isn't it easier when you just admit you are an anti-vaxxer? You didn't accidentally stumble upon one twidiots anti-vax message, you follow anti-vaxxers. It's who you are.

The good news is that myocarditis doesn't appear to be common. Here's a recent article on some studies out of Israel:

Quote:

He says the new studies clearly show that the benefits of vaccination against COVID-19 outweigh the risks of people aged 16 and older developing myocarditis. Previous research co-authored by Balicer found that in this age group, becoming infected with SARS-CoV-2 made a person 18 times more likely to develop myocarditis a much more significant risk than is observed following vaccination.

I checked your tweet to see if there was a link to data (there wasn't). I did find this great response though lol.



And once again you've proven yourself to be a shameless spreader of anti-vax misinformation and yet you blame me in you cowardice.

LOL and lest we forget next time 003 pretends he doesn't gleefully present anti-vax lies and misinformation, here's a response saying the data exactly corresponds to the US military. I don't know what the truth is, but I know that 003 posted his original anti-vaxxer garbage without regard to its accuracy.


dimitrig
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oski003 said:

Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

https://twitter.com/I7Bomb/status/1450203773721358341?t=BWlJ9mXXZRGz9CqLhDvUFw&s=19

Senator Ron Johnson accuses FDA of being in bed with big pharma, ignoring inexpensive treatments and vaccine VAERS data.
I didn't realize this was the thread where we post stupid things that Ron Johnson believes.

Here's one:
Quote:

I absolutely do not believe in the science of man-caused climate change," Johnson said. "It's not proven by any stretch of the imagination."

Johnson, in an interview last month, described believers in manmade causes of climate change as "crazy" and the theory as "lunacy."

"It's far more likely that it's just sunspot activity or just something in the geologic eons of time," he said.
Excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere "gets sucked down by trees and helps the trees grow," said Johnson.

Average Earth temperatures were relatively warm during the Middle Ages, Johnson said, and "it's not like there were tons of cars on the road."

He said he disagreed with any government spending to try to address global warming. A strong economy is the best way to preserve a good environment, Johnson said.




We are allowed to post something a senator says on the news even if some positions he holds seem crazy.
Yes, we are all aware that you will post every anti-vax view you can find. Johnson is a long-time anti-vaxxer and anti-science moron. In your parlance he seems to qualify as a real "scumbag".

He's one of the idiots who thought the Foxconn deal was good for Wisconsin lol
Quote:

"Today's groundbreaking is the start of an exciting chapter for southeastern Wisconsin. Not only will our state benefit from the jobs created directly at Foxconn, but also indirectly throughout the economy. I want to congratulate President Trump, Gov. Walker and Speaker Ryan for the commitment and vision to make this possible."
Give him a week and he'll have some other idiotic position. He still criticizes Harris for questioning the vaccines last year even though he now holds the exact same position he's accusing her of having held!
I don't post all the anti-vax views I can find, cupcake.

For example, I held back on this one. Nonetheless, I shall post it.



Australian Navy Stats:

In 31 years there have been 317 cases of myocarditis in service personnel.

This year, up to 28th September 2021, there have been 1,113 cases of myocarditis.


USucks Conclusion: the Australian Navy is full of anti-vaxxers faking myocarditis and oski003 is an anti-vaxxer for not posting how mild myocarditis is.


Well, there is some sort of virus going around in case you didn't hear.
oski003
How long do you want to ignore this user?
dimitrig said:

oski003 said:

Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

https://twitter.com/I7Bomb/status/1450203773721358341?t=BWlJ9mXXZRGz9CqLhDvUFw&s=19

Senator Ron Johnson accuses FDA of being in bed with big pharma, ignoring inexpensive treatments and vaccine VAERS data.
I didn't realize this was the thread where we post stupid things that Ron Johnson believes.

Here's one:
Quote:

I absolutely do not believe in the science of man-caused climate change," Johnson said. "It's not proven by any stretch of the imagination."

Johnson, in an interview last month, described believers in manmade causes of climate change as "crazy" and the theory as "lunacy."

"It's far more likely that it's just sunspot activity or just something in the geologic eons of time," he said.
Excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere "gets sucked down by trees and helps the trees grow," said Johnson.

Average Earth temperatures were relatively warm during the Middle Ages, Johnson said, and "it's not like there were tons of cars on the road."

He said he disagreed with any government spending to try to address global warming. A strong economy is the best way to preserve a good environment, Johnson said.




We are allowed to post something a senator says on the news even if some positions he holds seem crazy.
Yes, we are all aware that you will post every anti-vax view you can find. Johnson is a long-time anti-vaxxer and anti-science moron. In your parlance he seems to qualify as a real "scumbag".

He's one of the idiots who thought the Foxconn deal was good for Wisconsin lol
Quote:

"Today's groundbreaking is the start of an exciting chapter for southeastern Wisconsin. Not only will our state benefit from the jobs created directly at Foxconn, but also indirectly throughout the economy. I want to congratulate President Trump, Gov. Walker and Speaker Ryan for the commitment and vision to make this possible."
Give him a week and he'll have some other idiotic position. He still criticizes Harris for questioning the vaccines last year even though he now holds the exact same position he's accusing her of having held!
I don't post all the anti-vax views I can find, cupcake.

For example, I held back on this one. Nonetheless, I shall post it.



Australian Navy Stats:

In 31 years there have been 317 cases of myocarditis in service personnel.

This year, up to 28th September 2021, there have been 1,113 cases of myocarditis.


USucks Conclusion: the Australian Navy is full of anti-vaxxers faking myocarditis and oski003 is an anti-vaxxer for not posting how mild myocarditis is.


Well, there is some sort of virus going around in case you didn't hear.



Yeah, I haven't fact-checked it. I don't post everything I come across as USucks accuses. This could be an exaggeration.
Unit2Sucks
How long do you want to ignore this user?
oski003 said:

dimitrig said:

oski003 said:

Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

https://twitter.com/I7Bomb/status/1450203773721358341?t=BWlJ9mXXZRGz9CqLhDvUFw&s=19

Senator Ron Johnson accuses FDA of being in bed with big pharma, ignoring inexpensive treatments and vaccine VAERS data.
I didn't realize this was the thread where we post stupid things that Ron Johnson believes.

Here's one:
Quote:

I absolutely do not believe in the science of man-caused climate change," Johnson said. "It's not proven by any stretch of the imagination."

Johnson, in an interview last month, described believers in manmade causes of climate change as "crazy" and the theory as "lunacy."

"It's far more likely that it's just sunspot activity or just something in the geologic eons of time," he said.
Excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere "gets sucked down by trees and helps the trees grow," said Johnson.

Average Earth temperatures were relatively warm during the Middle Ages, Johnson said, and "it's not like there were tons of cars on the road."

He said he disagreed with any government spending to try to address global warming. A strong economy is the best way to preserve a good environment, Johnson said.




We are allowed to post something a senator says on the news even if some positions he holds seem crazy.
Yes, we are all aware that you will post every anti-vax view you can find. Johnson is a long-time anti-vaxxer and anti-science moron. In your parlance he seems to qualify as a real "scumbag".

He's one of the idiots who thought the Foxconn deal was good for Wisconsin lol
Quote:

"Today's groundbreaking is the start of an exciting chapter for southeastern Wisconsin. Not only will our state benefit from the jobs created directly at Foxconn, but also indirectly throughout the economy. I want to congratulate President Trump, Gov. Walker and Speaker Ryan for the commitment and vision to make this possible."
Give him a week and he'll have some other idiotic position. He still criticizes Harris for questioning the vaccines last year even though he now holds the exact same position he's accusing her of having held!
I don't post all the anti-vax views I can find, cupcake.

For example, I held back on this one. Nonetheless, I shall post it.



Australian Navy Stats:

In 31 years there have been 317 cases of myocarditis in service personnel.

This year, up to 28th September 2021, there have been 1,113 cases of myocarditis.


USucks Conclusion: the Australian Navy is full of anti-vaxxers faking myocarditis and oski003 is an anti-vaxxer for not posting how mild myocarditis is.


Well, there is some sort of virus going around in case you didn't hear.



Yeah, I haven't fact-checked it. I don't post everything I come across as USucks accuses. This could be an exaggeration.
As long as it's in service of your anti-vax agenda, does it really matter? Given how much time you spend seeking out anti-vax misinformation, it's understandable that some will slip through the five-hole. Don't feel bad though - maybe you will convince some idiot to believe your lies and make poor health decisions based on it. The anti-vax dream scenario!
oski003
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Increases in COVID-19 are unrelated to levels of vaccination across 68 countries and 2947 counties in the United States

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8481107/

Vaccination still protects against severe disease. Get vaxxed. Eventually, we will get a safe and effective vaccine and/or the virus will die out or become less deadly.
Unit2Sucks
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oski003 said:

Increases in COVID-19 are unrelated to levels of vaccination across 68 countries and 2947 counties in the United States

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8481107/

Vaccination still protects against severe disease. Get vaxxed. Eventually, we will get a safe and effective vaccine and/or the virus will die out or become less deadly.
Quote:

A Harvard Study Is Going Viral Among Anti-Vaxxers. The Author Says They Are All Wrong.

Anti-vaxxers say they've found a smoking gun: a new blue-chip paper that proves COVID vaccines are ineffective.

The vaccine "doesn't stop you from getting [COVID] at all," claimed Daniel Horowitz, a senior editor at the Blaze, in a tweet promoting a column he wrote trumpeting the research. The headline: "Harvard researcher finds absolutely no correlation between vax rates and COVID cases globally." Supporters of Horowitz's perspective tweeted the piece and posted it on Facebook, where it received more than 4,000 interactions, including 2,600 shares, according to data from CrowdTangle, the Facebook-owned analytics company.
"That conclusion is misleading…This paper supports vaccination."

Alas, there's just one problem for Horowitz and company: S.V. Subramanian, the Harvard professor of population health and geography behind the paper, says the vaccine doubters are completely wrong.

"That conclusion is misleading and inaccurate," Subramanian told me of Horowitz's Blaze column over email. "This paper supports vaccination as an important strategy for reducing infection and transmission, along with hand-washing, mask-wearing, and physical distancing."
It was inevitable that 003 would just fully give in to the anti-vaxx misinformation world at some point. That point appears to be now.
oski003
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

Increases in COVID-19 are unrelated to levels of vaccination across 68 countries and 2947 counties in the United States

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8481107/

Vaccination still protects against severe disease. Get vaxxed. Eventually, we will get a safe and effective vaccine and/or the virus will die out or become less deadly.
Quote:

A Harvard Study Is Going Viral Among Anti-Vaxxers. The Author Says They Are All Wrong.

Anti-vaxxers say they've found a smoking gun: a new blue-chip paper that proves COVID vaccines are ineffective.

The vaccine "doesn't stop you from getting [COVID] at all," claimed Daniel Horowitz, a senior editor at the Blaze, in a tweet promoting a column he wrote trumpeting the research. The headline: "Harvard researcher finds absolutely no correlation between vax rates and COVID cases globally." Supporters of Horowitz's perspective tweeted the piece and posted it on Facebook, where it received more than 4,000 interactions, including 2,600 shares, according to data from CrowdTangle, the Facebook-owned analytics company.
"That conclusion is misleading…This paper supports vaccination."

Alas, there's just one problem for Horowitz and company: S.V. Subramanian, the Harvard professor of population health and geography behind the paper, says the vaccine doubters are completely wrong.

"That conclusion is misleading and inaccurate," Subramanian told me of Horowitz's Blaze column over email. "This paper supports vaccination as an important strategy for reducing infection and transmission, along with hand-washing, mask-wearing, and physical distancing."
It was inevitable that 003 would just fully give in to the anti-vaxx misinformation world at some point. That point appears to be now.



You don't want this information shared so you call me anti-vax. Just for the record I am fully dosed Moderna. I got my flu shot. My dog got two vaccines two weeks ago and has an H1N1 second dose this weekend. Etc... Just not a big fan of our current covid 19 vaccines. I believe big pharma is enriching themselves at the expense of taxpayers with the help of the FDA. Pfizer hired Obama's FDA Chief. Moderna hedge fund hired Trump's chief. It sucks.

By the way, I don't KNOW that Ivermectin works. I have never taken it. However, I absolutely believe that Gilead and other BP are running a smear campaign against it with the help of lobbied mainstream media and lobbied FDA., who then go on to make big money at BP. It is a racket. Why, becaus they don't make money off of it.
Unit2Sucks
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Pfizer reported results from its booster study and they are pretty pretty good. 95% reduction in COVID infection compared to the vaccinated unboosted group. Obviously no long term studies on the effectiveness of boosters so we still have a big question mark on whether further boosters will be needed. I suspect that will largely depend on whether we allow COVID to continue to spread throughout the community because there are still going to be so many completely unvaccinated people.

Quote:

Pfizer, BioNTech say COVID-19 booster shot showed high efficacy in large study

BERLIN, Oct 21 (Reuters) - A booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer Inc (PFE.N) and German partner BioNTech SE (22UAy.DE) restored efficacy to 95.6% against the virus, including the Delta variant, data released by the companies from a large study showed on Thursday.

The companies said the trial, which has not been peer-reviewed, tested 10,000 participants aged 16 and older, and found that the booster shot had a favourable safety profile.

...

There were no reported cases of severe disease, suggesting robust protection from infection with only the primary vaccination series, Yee wrote in a note.

Pfizer had said its two-shot vaccine's efficacy drops over time, citing a study that showed 84% effectiveness from a peak of 96% four months after a second dose. Some countries had already gone ahead with plans to give booster doses.

The drugmakers said on Thursday the median time between the second dose and the booster shot or the placebo in the study was around 11 months, adding there were only five cases of COVID-19 in the booster group, compared with 109 cases in the group which received the placebo shot.



dimitrig
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Unit2Sucks said:

Pfizer reported results from its booster study and they are pretty pretty good. 95% reduction in COVID infection compared to the vaccinated unboosted group. Obviously no long term studies on the effectiveness of boosters so we still have a big question mark on whether further boosters will be needed. I suspect that will largely depend on whether we allow COVID to continue to spread throughout the community because there are still going to be so many completely unvaccinated people.

Quote:

Pfizer, BioNTech say COVID-19 booster shot showed high efficacy in large study

BERLIN, Oct 21 (Reuters) - A booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer Inc (PFE.N) and German partner BioNTech SE (22UAy.DE) restored efficacy to 95.6% against the virus, including the Delta variant, data released by the companies from a large study showed on Thursday.

The companies said the trial, which has not been peer-reviewed, tested 10,000 participants aged 16 and older, and found that the booster shot had a favourable safety profile.

...

There were no reported cases of severe disease, suggesting robust protection from infection with only the primary vaccination series, Yee wrote in a note.

Pfizer had said its two-shot vaccine's efficacy drops over time, citing a study that showed 84% effectiveness from a peak of 96% four months after a second dose. Some countries had already gone ahead with plans to give booster doses.

The drugmakers said on Thursday the median time between the second dose and the booster shot or the placebo in the study was around 11 months, adding there were only five cases of COVID-19 in the booster group, compared with 109 cases in the group which received the placebo shot.


Well, of course if you keep eliciting a response then the body is going to keep producing antibodies. However, this isn't tenable unless you intend to keep getting shots forever.

It is surprising to me that 1% of the (fully vaccinated) placebo group contracted COVID-19. That seems like an awfully large number.

I wonder how severe those cases were.

bearister
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Pandemic news:

WeWork becomes a public company after spectacular implosion - Axios


https://www.axios.com/how-the-pandemic-caused-a-corporate-rebound-e61de9c0-f455-4417-84ef-94239a6782ce.html
Cancel my subscription to the Resurrection
Send my credentials to the House of Detention
I got some friends inside
Unit2Sucks
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dimitrig said:

Unit2Sucks said:

Pfizer reported results from its booster study and they are pretty pretty good. 95% reduction in COVID infection compared to the vaccinated unboosted group. Obviously no long term studies on the effectiveness of boosters so we still have a big question mark on whether further boosters will be needed. I suspect that will largely depend on whether we allow COVID to continue to spread throughout the community because there are still going to be so many completely unvaccinated people.

Quote:

Pfizer, BioNTech say COVID-19 booster shot showed high efficacy in large study

BERLIN, Oct 21 (Reuters) - A booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer Inc (PFE.N) and German partner BioNTech SE (22UAy.DE) restored efficacy to 95.6% against the virus, including the Delta variant, data released by the companies from a large study showed on Thursday.

The companies said the trial, which has not been peer-reviewed, tested 10,000 participants aged 16 and older, and found that the booster shot had a favourable safety profile.

...

There were no reported cases of severe disease, suggesting robust protection from infection with only the primary vaccination series, Yee wrote in a note.

Pfizer had said its two-shot vaccine's efficacy drops over time, citing a study that showed 84% effectiveness from a peak of 96% four months after a second dose. Some countries had already gone ahead with plans to give booster doses.

The drugmakers said on Thursday the median time between the second dose and the booster shot or the placebo in the study was around 11 months, adding there were only five cases of COVID-19 in the booster group, compared with 109 cases in the group which received the placebo shot.


Well, of course if you keep eliciting a response then the body is going to keep producing antibodies. However, this isn't tenable unless you intend to keep getting shots forever.

It is surprising to me that 1% of the (fully vaccinated) placebo group contracted COVID-19. That seems like an awfully large number.

I wonder how severe those cases were.


It says there were no severe cases, but don't know what the range of outcomes was. Sometimes "mild" cases including anything that doesn't involve hospitalization which isn't super helpful as a classification system for severity at this point.

I don't have a sense as to whether 1% contracting COVID is high or not because we don't know how many cases there would have been in a comparable unvaccinated population.

dimitrig
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Unit2Sucks said:

dimitrig said:

Unit2Sucks said:

Pfizer reported results from its booster study and they are pretty pretty good. 95% reduction in COVID infection compared to the vaccinated unboosted group. Obviously no long term studies on the effectiveness of boosters so we still have a big question mark on whether further boosters will be needed. I suspect that will largely depend on whether we allow COVID to continue to spread throughout the community because there are still going to be so many completely unvaccinated people.

Quote:

Pfizer, BioNTech say COVID-19 booster shot showed high efficacy in large study

BERLIN, Oct 21 (Reuters) - A booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer Inc (PFE.N) and German partner BioNTech SE (22UAy.DE) restored efficacy to 95.6% against the virus, including the Delta variant, data released by the companies from a large study showed on Thursday.

The companies said the trial, which has not been peer-reviewed, tested 10,000 participants aged 16 and older, and found that the booster shot had a favourable safety profile.

...

There were no reported cases of severe disease, suggesting robust protection from infection with only the primary vaccination series, Yee wrote in a note.

Pfizer had said its two-shot vaccine's efficacy drops over time, citing a study that showed 84% effectiveness from a peak of 96% four months after a second dose. Some countries had already gone ahead with plans to give booster doses.

The drugmakers said on Thursday the median time between the second dose and the booster shot or the placebo in the study was around 11 months, adding there were only five cases of COVID-19 in the booster group, compared with 109 cases in the group which received the placebo shot.


Well, of course if you keep eliciting a response then the body is going to keep producing antibodies. However, this isn't tenable unless you intend to keep getting shots forever.

It is surprising to me that 1% of the (fully vaccinated) placebo group contracted COVID-19. That seems like an awfully large number.

I wonder how severe those cases were.


It says there were no severe cases, but don't know what the range of outcomes was. Sometimes "mild" cases including anything that doesn't involve hospitalization which isn't super helpful as a classification system for severity at this point.

I don't have a sense as to whether 1% contracting COVID is high or not because we don't know how many cases there would have been in a comparable unvaccinated population.

Well, we have been told there is 98% efficacy so we can assume that it would have been something like 5500 cases (2% of 5500 is 110) which is more than half of the population in the study. That seems really high or else that 98% number is very wrong.

oski003
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Vaccine caused Myocarditis is underreported.

https://youtu.be/H7inaTiDKaU?list=RDCMUCF9IOB2TExg3QIBupFtBDxg
Unit2Sucks
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dimitrig said:

Unit2Sucks said:

dimitrig said:

Unit2Sucks said:

Pfizer reported results from its booster study and they are pretty pretty good. 95% reduction in COVID infection compared to the vaccinated unboosted group. Obviously no long term studies on the effectiveness of boosters so we still have a big question mark on whether further boosters will be needed. I suspect that will largely depend on whether we allow COVID to continue to spread throughout the community because there are still going to be so many completely unvaccinated people.

Quote:

Pfizer, BioNTech say COVID-19 booster shot showed high efficacy in large study

BERLIN, Oct 21 (Reuters) - A booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer Inc (PFE.N) and German partner BioNTech SE (22UAy.DE) restored efficacy to 95.6% against the virus, including the Delta variant, data released by the companies from a large study showed on Thursday.

The companies said the trial, which has not been peer-reviewed, tested 10,000 participants aged 16 and older, and found that the booster shot had a favourable safety profile.

...

There were no reported cases of severe disease, suggesting robust protection from infection with only the primary vaccination series, Yee wrote in a note.

Pfizer had said its two-shot vaccine's efficacy drops over time, citing a study that showed 84% effectiveness from a peak of 96% four months after a second dose. Some countries had already gone ahead with plans to give booster doses.

The drugmakers said on Thursday the median time between the second dose and the booster shot or the placebo in the study was around 11 months, adding there were only five cases of COVID-19 in the booster group, compared with 109 cases in the group which received the placebo shot.


Well, of course if you keep eliciting a response then the body is going to keep producing antibodies. However, this isn't tenable unless you intend to keep getting shots forever.

It is surprising to me that 1% of the (fully vaccinated) placebo group contracted COVID-19. That seems like an awfully large number.

I wonder how severe those cases were.


It says there were no severe cases, but don't know what the range of outcomes was. Sometimes "mild" cases including anything that doesn't involve hospitalization which isn't super helpful as a classification system for severity at this point.

I don't have a sense as to whether 1% contracting COVID is high or not because we don't know how many cases there would have been in a comparable unvaccinated population.

Well, we have been told there is 98% efficacy so we can assume that it would have been something like 5500 cases (2% of 5500 is 110) which is more than half of the population in the study. That seems really high or else that 98% number is very wrong.


The 95% efficacy is vs the unboosted vaccinated participants. There were 5 cases in the boosted group and 109 in the unboosted group. No comparison was made to unvaccinated population because they weren't included in the trial. Given what we know about Delta's ability to infect vaccinated, and the average time since last dose being 11 months, it's likely that the unboosted resistance to vaccination was less than 80%, meaning we would have seen perhaps 500 cases in an unvaccinated population of the same size.

For what it's worth, approx 8 million Americans tested positive for COVID during August and September (source), which is ~3% of the population. I don't know the period for the Pfizer trial but I would suspect that they did more frequent sentinel testing and that they did a better job uncovering mild cases than we do as a nation generally.
oski003
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Holy smokes. This is crazy. Give us a technology that doesn't cause this.



21. This point has been made before, but boy, this rate of myocarditis in younger males (under 20 yo) after an mRNA vaccine is ... not small.

Under 20 after 2nd dose is > 100 in a million . 2/3 fully recovered within 6 weeks of diagnosis. American College of Cardiology recommends limiting strenuous activity for 3-6 months.
Unit2Sucks
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Unit2Sucks said:

dimitrig said:

Unit2Sucks said:

dimitrig said:

Unit2Sucks said:

Pfizer reported results from its booster study and they are pretty pretty good. 95% reduction in COVID infection compared to the vaccinated unboosted group. Obviously no long term studies on the effectiveness of boosters so we still have a big question mark on whether further boosters will be needed. I suspect that will largely depend on whether we allow COVID to continue to spread throughout the community because there are still going to be so many completely unvaccinated people.

Quote:

Pfizer, BioNTech say COVID-19 booster shot showed high efficacy in large study

BERLIN, Oct 21 (Reuters) - A booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer Inc (PFE.N) and German partner BioNTech SE (22UAy.DE) restored efficacy to 95.6% against the virus, including the Delta variant, data released by the companies from a large study showed on Thursday.

The companies said the trial, which has not been peer-reviewed, tested 10,000 participants aged 16 and older, and found that the booster shot had a favourable safety profile.

...

There were no reported cases of severe disease, suggesting robust protection from infection with only the primary vaccination series, Yee wrote in a note.

Pfizer had said its two-shot vaccine's efficacy drops over time, citing a study that showed 84% effectiveness from a peak of 96% four months after a second dose. Some countries had already gone ahead with plans to give booster doses.

The drugmakers said on Thursday the median time between the second dose and the booster shot or the placebo in the study was around 11 months, adding there were only five cases of COVID-19 in the booster group, compared with 109 cases in the group which received the placebo shot.


Well, of course if you keep eliciting a response then the body is going to keep producing antibodies. However, this isn't tenable unless you intend to keep getting shots forever.

It is surprising to me that 1% of the (fully vaccinated) placebo group contracted COVID-19. That seems like an awfully large number.

I wonder how severe those cases were.


It says there were no severe cases, but don't know what the range of outcomes was. Sometimes "mild" cases including anything that doesn't involve hospitalization which isn't super helpful as a classification system for severity at this point.

I don't have a sense as to whether 1% contracting COVID is high or not because we don't know how many cases there would have been in a comparable unvaccinated population.

Well, we have been told there is 98% efficacy so we can assume that it would have been something like 5500 cases (2% of 5500 is 110) which is more than half of the population in the study. That seems really high or else that 98% number is very wrong.


The 95% efficacy is vs the unboosted vaccinated participants. There were 5 cases in the boosted group and 109 in the unboosted group. No comparison was made to unvaccinated population because they weren't included in the trial. Given what we know about Delta's ability to infect vaccinated, and the average time since last dose being 11 months, it's likely that the unboosted resistance to vaccination was less than 80%, meaning we would have seen perhaps 500 cases in an unvaccinated population of the same size.

For what it's worth, approx 8 million Americans tested positive for COVID during August and September (source), which is ~3% of the population. I don't know the period for the Pfizer trial but I would suspect that they did more frequent sentinel testing and that they did a better job uncovering mild cases than we do as a nation generally.
I was also reminded this evening that the booster efficacy is particularly strong given that it occurred during the Delta surge. The original 95%+ efficacy that was frequently touted came vs wildtype or milder variants. I don't think we've ever seen anywhere above 88% efficacy vs Delta so a 95% efficacy vs unboosted Pfizer in a Delta surge is quite impressive.
bearister
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So, in other words, after getting the 3rd spike it wouldn't be inappropriate behavior to take to an urban balcony and proclaim:
"I AM A GOLDEN GOD!"

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Send my credentials to the House of Detention
I got some friends inside
oski003
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Unit2Sucks said:

Unit2Sucks said:

dimitrig said:

Unit2Sucks said:

dimitrig said:

Unit2Sucks said:

Pfizer reported results from its booster study and they are pretty pretty good. 95% reduction in COVID infection compared to the vaccinated unboosted group. Obviously no long term studies on the effectiveness of boosters so we still have a big question mark on whether further boosters will be needed. I suspect that will largely depend on whether we allow COVID to continue to spread throughout the community because there are still going to be so many completely unvaccinated people.

Quote:

Pfizer, BioNTech say COVID-19 booster shot showed high efficacy in large study

BERLIN, Oct 21 (Reuters) - A booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer Inc (PFE.N) and German partner BioNTech SE (22UAy.DE) restored efficacy to 95.6% against the virus, including the Delta variant, data released by the companies from a large study showed on Thursday.

The companies said the trial, which has not been peer-reviewed, tested 10,000 participants aged 16 and older, and found that the booster shot had a favourable safety profile.

...

There were no reported cases of severe disease, suggesting robust protection from infection with only the primary vaccination series, Yee wrote in a note.

Pfizer had said its two-shot vaccine's efficacy drops over time, citing a study that showed 84% effectiveness from a peak of 96% four months after a second dose. Some countries had already gone ahead with plans to give booster doses.

The drugmakers said on Thursday the median time between the second dose and the booster shot or the placebo in the study was around 11 months, adding there were only five cases of COVID-19 in the booster group, compared with 109 cases in the group which received the placebo shot.


Well, of course if you keep eliciting a response then the body is going to keep producing antibodies. However, this isn't tenable unless you intend to keep getting shots forever.

It is surprising to me that 1% of the (fully vaccinated) placebo group contracted COVID-19. That seems like an awfully large number.

I wonder how severe those cases were.


It says there were no severe cases, but don't know what the range of outcomes was. Sometimes "mild" cases including anything that doesn't involve hospitalization which isn't super helpful as a classification system for severity at this point.

I don't have a sense as to whether 1% contracting COVID is high or not because we don't know how many cases there would have been in a comparable unvaccinated population.

Well, we have been told there is 98% efficacy so we can assume that it would have been something like 5500 cases (2% of 5500 is 110) which is more than half of the population in the study. That seems really high or else that 98% number is very wrong.


The 95% efficacy is vs the unboosted vaccinated participants. There were 5 cases in the boosted group and 109 in the unboosted group. No comparison was made to unvaccinated population because they weren't included in the trial. Given what we know about Delta's ability to infect vaccinated, and the average time since last dose being 11 months, it's likely that the unboosted resistance to vaccination was less than 80%, meaning we would have seen perhaps 500 cases in an unvaccinated population of the same size.

For what it's worth, approx 8 million Americans tested positive for COVID during August and September (source), which is ~3% of the population. I don't know the period for the Pfizer trial but I would suspect that they did more frequent sentinel testing and that they did a better job uncovering mild cases than we do as a nation generally.
I was also reminded this evening that the booster efficacy is particularly strong given that it occurred during the Delta surge. The original 95%+ efficacy that was frequently touted came vs wildtype or milder variants. I don't think we've ever seen anywhere above 88% efficacy vs Delta so a 95% efficacy vs unboosted Pfizer in a Delta surge is quite impressive.


The health authorities blamed the waning immunity on the Delta Variant until it was clear they just had vaccines with poor durability.
Unit2Sucks
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oski003 said:

Holy smokes. This is crazy. Give us a technology that doesn't cause this.



21. This point has been made before, but boy, this rate of myocarditis in younger males (under 20 yo) after an mRNA vaccine is ... not small.

Under 20 after 2nd dose is > 100 in a million . 2/3 fully recovered within 6 weeks of diagnosis. American College of Cardiology recommends limiting strenuous activity for 3-6 months.
This is 1 in 10,000. I think we can all agree that fewer is better, and this is fewer than you've alleged previously. It would be great if the number were even lower of course.
oski003 said:

More information on myocarditis and mRNA vaccines. 1 in 1000 is far from ideal for teenagers.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.news-medical.net/amp/news/20210920/Myocarditis-risk-from-mRNA-COVID-vaccines-re-evaluated-in-Canadian-study.aspx

Edited to add that nobody in this study died of myocarditis, per Unit2Sucks.

As we can all see, just a month ago you made the alarmist post above saying that it was 1 in 1,000. Now you're saying it's 10x less frequent. Isn't that good news?

The real question you assiduously avoid is whether people are at higher risk of eventually getting myocarditis from COVID or a vaccine. Given that COVID is highly prevalent assured to be endemic, I would imagine the chances any unvaccinated person catches COVID is quite high, if not 100%. The fewer people get vaccinated, the more prevalent COVID will continue to remain and the more likely unvaccinated people will be to become infected. The more successful the anti-vaxxers are in scaring people from getting vaccines, the more likely those same people are to suffer myocarditis (the thing they are trying to avoid) by condemning themselves to catching COVID.

oski003
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Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

Holy smokes. This is crazy. Give us a technology that doesn't cause this.



21. This point has been made before, but boy, this rate of myocarditis in younger males (under 20 yo) after an mRNA vaccine is ... not small.

Under 20 after 2nd dose is > 100 in a million . 2/3 fully recovered within 6 weeks of diagnosis. American College of Cardiology recommends limiting strenuous activity for 3-6 months.
This is 1 in 10,000. I think we can all agree that fewer is better, and this is fewer than you've alleged previously. It would be great if the number were even lower of course.
oski003 said:

More information on myocarditis and mRNA vaccines. 1 in 1000 is far from ideal for teenagers.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.news-medical.net/amp/news/20210920/Myocarditis-risk-from-mRNA-COVID-vaccines-re-evaluated-in-Canadian-study.aspx

Edited to add that nobody in this study died of myocarditis, per Unit2Sucks.

As we can all see, just a month ago you made the alarmist post above saying that it was 1 in 1,000. Now you're saying it's 10x less frequent. Isn't that good news?

The real question you assiduously avoid is whether people are at higher risk of eventually getting myocarditis from COVID or a vaccine. Given that COVID is highly prevalent assured to be endemic, I would imagine the chances any unvaccinated person catches COVID is quite high, if not 100%. The fewer people get vaccinated, the more prevalent COVID will continue to remain and the more likely unvaccinated people will be to become infected. The more successful the anti-vaxxers are in scaring people from getting vaccines, the more likely those same people are to suffer myocarditis (the thing they are trying to avoid) by condemning themselves to catching COVID.




Helen Branswell is a Canadian infectious diseases and global health reporter at Stat News. Branswell spent fifteen years as a medical reporter at The Canadian Press. She led coverage of the Ebola, Zika, SARS and swine flu pandemics, as well as the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. She typically errors on the conservative side when criticizing the only vaccines we have against covid.
Whether it is 1/1000 or 1/10000, it is too high.

Many times I have mentioned that young healthy people could fight off light or medium exposure of the virus. However, injecting them with MANY times more of the mechanism causing myocarditis is not rational for young healthy people, especially those who have already had covid 19. Honestly, both my nose picking, surface licking toddlers that have been in daycare/school since June 2020 have likely been exposed to covid 19.

If the mRNA vaccines were safer, I'd have a different opinion. The risk reward on an individual basis would make more sense for almost everyone.

Again, my viewpoint has generally been against the medical establishment that is moving toward granting eua to the age group my young son is in and what will be mandated. It scares me. Fauci's BP greased NIAID and the BP greased FDA are pushing these vaccines and censoring opposition. Give us safer alternatives.
dimitrig
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I got my second Pfizer shot recently - about 5 1/2 months after the first.

Beforehand, I did a lot of research about vaccine-related side-effects including myocarditis and its treatment.

It seems that almost all of the severe (hospitalized) cases were treated with ibuprofen. Some of them also had other treatments such as intravenous steroids, but those cases didn't have any better outcomes so it seems that likely NSAIDs are enough to treat the inflammation. (That is not my conclusion, but the conclusion of research so far.)

When time came for me to get the shot, I treated with NSAIDs starting two hours beforehand. A few of the nurses at the clinic said they basically did the same thing. Most of them have had their third shots by now, BTW. Some of them told me the second shot got them pretty sick so they wanted to do something to counter that. It was an ER doctor who told me that he and most of his associates took acetaminophen 2 hours before the injection and then dosed with ibuprofen regularly thereafter.

It seems most of us might be a lot better off just taking NSAIDs just before receiving the mRNA vaccines (which cause inflammation) and ignoring medical advice to wait until we have adverse symptoms (headache, fever, chills) to take them.

Some physicians are cautious, saying that NSAIDs may render the vaccine less effective, but all previous studies (using other vaccines) have shown that to not be the case.

Anyway, I got the 2nd shot and had far fewer side-effects from it than I did from the 1st one. Like an idiot, I took nothing before/after the first one.

YMMV, but as an Internet Doctor I would recommend considering taking NSAIDs if you think you might be at risk of an extreme inflammatory response to the vaccine.





Big C
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dimitrig said:


I got my second Pfizer shot recently - about 5 1/2 months after the first.

Beforehand, I did a lot of research about vaccine-related side-effects including myocarditis and its treatment.

It seems that almost all of the severe (hospitalized) cases were treated with ibuprofen. Some of them also had other treatments such as intravenous steroids, but those cases didn't have any better outcomes so it seems that likely NSAIDs are enough to treat the inflammation. (That is not my conclusion, but the conclusion of research so far.)

When time came for me to get the shot, I treated with NSAIDs starting two hours beforehand. A few of the nurses at the clinic said they basically did the same thing. Most of them have had their third shots by now, BTW. Some of them told me the second shot got them pretty sick so they wanted to do something to counter that. It was an ER doctor who told me that he and most of his associates took acetaminophen 2 hours before the injection and then dosed with ibuprofen regularly thereafter.

It seems most of us might be a lot better off just taking NSAIDs just before receiving the mRNA vaccines (which cause inflammation) and ignoring medical advice to wait until we have adverse symptoms (headache, fever, chills) to take them.

Some physicians are cautious, saying that NSAIDs may render the vaccine less effective, but all previous studies (using other vaccines) have shown that to not be the case.

Anyway, I got the 2nd shot and had far fewer side-effects from it than I did from the 1st one. Like an idiot, I took nothing before/after the first one.

YMMV, but as an Internet Doctor I would recommend considering taking NSAIDs if you think you might be at risk of an extreme inflammatory response to the vaccine.








If somebody thinks they might be at risk of an "extreme inflammatory response" to the vaccine, there might be two possibilities:

1) They "did their own research" and it was sh***y research, like the kind most non-scientists would do on this subject.

2) They are among the rare individuals who might actually be at risk of having an "extreme inflammatory response" to the vaccine, in which case I doubt a couple of ibuprofen would help. Hopefully these people are under a doctor's monitoring and have been warned to not be vaccinated, or at least only under close medical supervision.

I had only minor injection-site soreness from my two Pfizers. I'm no doctor (I don't even play one on TV), but I think some people hear this stuff about reactions and they talk their body into having one. These are the same people who are susceptible to hypnosis (according to Non-Dr. Big C).
dimitrig
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Big C said:

dimitrig said:


I got my second Pfizer shot recently - about 5 1/2 months after the first.

Beforehand, I did a lot of research about vaccine-related side-effects including myocarditis and its treatment.

It seems that almost all of the severe (hospitalized) cases were treated with ibuprofen. Some of them also had other treatments such as intravenous steroids, but those cases didn't have any better outcomes so it seems that likely NSAIDs are enough to treat the inflammation. (That is not my conclusion, but the conclusion of research so far.)

When time came for me to get the shot, I treated with NSAIDs starting two hours beforehand. A few of the nurses at the clinic said they basically did the same thing. Most of them have had their third shots by now, BTW. Some of them told me the second shot got them pretty sick so they wanted to do something to counter that. It was an ER doctor who told me that he and most of his associates took acetaminophen 2 hours before the injection and then dosed with ibuprofen regularly thereafter.

It seems most of us might be a lot better off just taking NSAIDs just before receiving the mRNA vaccines (which cause inflammation) and ignoring medical advice to wait until we have adverse symptoms (headache, fever, chills) to take them.

Some physicians are cautious, saying that NSAIDs may render the vaccine less effective, but all previous studies (using other vaccines) have shown that to not be the case.

Anyway, I got the 2nd shot and had far fewer side-effects from it than I did from the 1st one. Like an idiot, I took nothing before/after the first one.

YMMV, but as an Internet Doctor I would recommend considering taking NSAIDs if you think you might be at risk of an extreme inflammatory response to the vaccine.








If somebody thinks they might be at risk of an "extreme inflammatory response" to the vaccine, there might be two possibilities:

1) They "did their own research" and it was sh***y research, like the kind most non-scientists would do on this subject.

2) They are among the rare individuals who might actually be at risk of having an "extreme inflammatory response" to the vaccine, in which case I doubt a couple of ibuprofen would help. Hopefully these people are under a doctor's monitoring and have been warned to not be vaccinated, or at least only under close medical supervision.

I had only minor injection-site soreness from my two Pfizers. I'm no doctor (I don't even play one on TV), but I think some people hear this stuff about reactions and they talk their body into having one. These are the same people who are susceptible to hypnosis (according to Non-Dr. Big C).

Well, there are some young men who had myocarditis as a result and 600 mg of ibuprofen every 6 hours resolved it so ibuprofen does help. Those are clinical results and I don't think the people who ended up in the hospital "talked their body into" having a reaction.

I am glad you didn't have any side-effects, but that's atypical. Most people don't have anything like myocarditis that lands them in the hospital, but side-effects are very common. NSAIDs seem to help with those.





Big C
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dimitrig said:

Big C said:

dimitrig said:


I got my second Pfizer shot recently - about 5 1/2 months after the first.

Beforehand, I did a lot of research about vaccine-related side-effects including myocarditis and its treatment.

It seems that almost all of the severe (hospitalized) cases were treated with ibuprofen. Some of them also had other treatments such as intravenous steroids, but those cases didn't have any better outcomes so it seems that likely NSAIDs are enough to treat the inflammation. (That is not my conclusion, but the conclusion of research so far.)

When time came for me to get the shot, I treated with NSAIDs starting two hours beforehand. A few of the nurses at the clinic said they basically did the same thing. Most of them have had their third shots by now, BTW. Some of them told me the second shot got them pretty sick so they wanted to do something to counter that. It was an ER doctor who told me that he and most of his associates took acetaminophen 2 hours before the injection and then dosed with ibuprofen regularly thereafter.

It seems most of us might be a lot better off just taking NSAIDs just before receiving the mRNA vaccines (which cause inflammation) and ignoring medical advice to wait until we have adverse symptoms (headache, fever, chills) to take them.

Some physicians are cautious, saying that NSAIDs may render the vaccine less effective, but all previous studies (using other vaccines) have shown that to not be the case.

Anyway, I got the 2nd shot and had far fewer side-effects from it than I did from the 1st one. Like an idiot, I took nothing before/after the first one.

YMMV, but as an Internet Doctor I would recommend considering taking NSAIDs if you think you might be at risk of an extreme inflammatory response to the vaccine.








If somebody thinks they might be at risk of an "extreme inflammatory response" to the vaccine, there might be two possibilities:

1) They "did their own research" and it was sh***y research, like the kind most non-scientists would do on this subject.

2) They are among the rare individuals who might actually be at risk of having an "extreme inflammatory response" to the vaccine, in which case I doubt a couple of ibuprofen would help. Hopefully these people are under a doctor's monitoring and have been warned to not be vaccinated, or at least only under close medical supervision.

I had only minor injection-site soreness from my two Pfizers. I'm no doctor (I don't even play one on TV), but I think some people hear this stuff about reactions and they talk their body into having one. These are the same people who are susceptible to hypnosis (according to Non-Dr. Big C).

Well, there are a lot of young men who had myocarditis as a result and 600 mg of ibuprofen every 6 hours resolved it so ibuprofen does help. Those are clinical results and I don't think the people who ended up in the hospital "talked their body into" having a reaction.

I am glad you didn't have any side-effects, but that's atypical.





Actually, my understanding is that approximately half the vaccine recipients have no adverse reaction symptoms (save for mild shoulder soreness).

My problem here might be the definition of an "extreme inflammatory response". What does that constitute exactly?

Do you happen to know how many young men have had myocarditis that can be traced to the vaccine? Then we can talk about the definition of "a lot".

Anyway, I'm glad you got your second shot and are well. It's sounding like waiting longer than three weeks between jabs was a good idea, in general. Great Britain is having tons of cases lately... but not too many fatalities.
Unit2Sucks
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More context for the "natural immunity" crowd: Long-Term Elevated Inflammatory Protein Levels in Asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 Infected Individuals

Quote:

These, mostly asymptomatic individuals, were reanalyzed 7-8 months after their infection together with 115 age-matched seronegative controls. We found that 7-8 months after the infection their antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 Nucleocapsid (N) protein declined whereas we found no decrease in the antibodies to Spike receptor-binding domain (S-RBD) when compared to the findings at seropositivity identification. In contrast to antibodies to N protein, the antibodies to S-RBD correlated with the viral neutralization capacity and with CD4+ T cell responses as measured by antigen-specific upregulation of CD137 and CD69 markers. Unexpectedly we found the asymptomatic antibody-positive individuals to have increased serum levels of S100A12, TGF-alpha, IL18, and OSM, the markers of activated macrophages-monocytes, suggesting long-term persistent inflammatory effect associated with the viral infection in asymptomatic individuals. Our results support the evidence for the long-term persistence of the inflammation process and the need for post-infection clinical monitoring of SARS-CoV-2 infected asymptomatic individuals.
Moral of the story is that even mild or asymptomatic COVID infections can lead to persistent inflammation. Some of these elevated serum levels are associated with negative health outcomes like heart disease.
oski003
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https://theegg.house/top-physicians-file-lawsuit-against-the-fda-for-access-to-pfizers-covid-19-vaccine-data/

These physicians aren't necessarily questioning the vaccine mandates. However, they are questioning mandating these vaccines and hiding the data regarding side effects, etc...
bearister
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Hopefully tRump Walks the Walk for his Deplorable base and avoids getting a booster so that next time he has a Covita moment, he drops over the balcony like a lumpy sack o taters.

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oski003
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If it is truly "only" a 1/10,000 chance of myocarditis, this couple is 1 in 100 million. 1/10,000 chance would never get approved absent a pandemic. Where are the safe vaccines?

https://twitter.com/Angelasfreenews/status/1451018479805648899?t=d0ib08_IOmqouPAZ_fcYUQ&s=19
Eastern Oregon Bear
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oski003 said:

If it is truly "only" a 1/10,000 chance of myocarditis, this couple is 1 in 100 million. 1/10,000 chance would never get approved absent a pandemic. Where are the safe vaccines?

https://twitter.com/Angelasfreenews/status/1451018479805648899?t=d0ib08_IOmqouPAZ_fcYUQ&s=19
There are 6 billion people in the world. There will be couples like this. Even in the US you would expect to find some couples like this one. Perhaps strenuous physical training isn't a good idea right after getting vaccinated. Let me know in a few weeks if they are still ill.
oski003
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Eastern Oregon Bear said:

oski003 said:

If it is truly "only" a 1/10,000 chance of myocarditis, this couple is 1 in 100 million. 1/10,000 chance would never get approved absent a pandemic. Where are the safe vaccines?

https://twitter.com/Angelasfreenews/status/1451018479805648899?t=d0ib08_IOmqouPAZ_fcYUQ&s=19
There are 6 billion people in the world. There will be couples like this. Even in the US you would expect to find some couples like this one. Perhaps strenuous physical training isn't a good idea right after getting vaccinated. Let me know in a few weeks if they are still ill.


The denominator is couples in the world fully vaccinated with mRNA, not people in the world. This is one person with the gumption to speak up amongst fully vaccinated mRNA couples.
bearister
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Worst of US pandemic likely behind us but we can't drop our guard, experts say


https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/oct/25/us-covid-coronavirus-pandemic-experts?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other
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Unit2Sucks
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oski003 said:

If it is truly "only" a 1/10,000 chance of myocarditis, this couple is 1 in 100 million. 1/10,000 chance would never get approved absent a pandemic. Where are the safe vaccines?

https://twitter.com/Angelasfreenews/status/1451018479805648899?t=d0ib08_IOmqouPAZ_fcYUQ&s=19
You don't know how math works if you think it's 1 in 100 million. Look up the birthday problem.

This could absolutely be true and not in any way contradict the 1/10k chances. Also, one of these two had pericarditis and not myocarditis, so could be some personal circumstances because I thought that was more common with older people than younger people.
oski003
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Unit2Sucks said:

oski003 said:

If it is truly "only" a 1/10,000 chance of myocarditis, this couple is 1 in 100 million. 1/10,000 chance would never get approved absent a pandemic. Where are the safe vaccines?

https://twitter.com/Angelasfreenews/status/1451018479805648899?t=d0ib08_IOmqouPAZ_fcYUQ&s=19
You don't know how math works if you think it's 1 in 100 million. Look up the birthday problem.

This could absolutely be true and not in any way contradict the 1/10k chances. Also, one of these two had pericarditis and not myocarditis, so could be some personal circumstances because I thought that was more common with older people than younger people.


I understand math. Birthday is 1/365. If you have 30 in a class, the odds of two people having the same birthday are pretty high.

In this example, the odds of this couple having myo/pericarditis is 1/100 million. I do not know how many couples under 40 got vaccinated with mRNA vax. The odds of any couple in the world both having vaccine caused heart injuries is fairly high because the mRNA vaccine has a high rate of heart related injuries (compared to other vaccines) and a lot of couples got vaxxed with mRNA.
 
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