White House has settled in

sycasey
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Unit2Sucks said:

How do you think the victims of the Tree of Life attack feel? Is there any other bigotry that you feel is inconsequential to its victims? Why would you feel the need to make that comparison in the first place?
Because one attack on a synagogue is very different from the government systematically rounding up people of a certain descent and placing them into camps? At least within the confines of how "we" as a nation treat a particular ethnic group?

I don't want to downplay the tragedy felt by those who knew people killed in that attack or how it impacts the Jewish community at large, but it wasn't the government doing that to them, at least not directly.
sycasey
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bearister said:

Yogi Bear said:

"I've never really thought about this before, but I wonder why no one ever questioned why we put Japanese in internment camps, but not German-Americans?

Probably racism against Asians but Wikipedia offers up this:

"Although the War Department (now the Department of Defense) considered mass expulsion of ethnic Germans and ethnic Italians from the East or West coast areas for reasons of military security, it did not follow through with this. The numbers of people involved would have been overwhelming to manage." Wikipedia

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internment_of_German_Americans

Yup. German-Americans were white and too numerous for it to be practical. Japanese-Americans (at the time) were a small enough minority to be easily persecuted.
BearsWiin
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bearister said:

Anarchistbear said:

If Omar's truthful remarks about Israel are used to paint her as anti Semite than by the same measure Trump's treatment of Israel makes him a Pro- Semite, more so than any US President in history as witness this billboard for Bibi's re-election campaign




"But U.S. and Israeli interests are not identical. They often collide, and when they do, U.S. interests must prevail." Patrick J. Buchanan, Whose War? (2003)

https://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/whose-war/

You don't have to believe the whole 1980 October Surprise conspiracy theory (not verified but not ruled out) to understand that the Israelis sent a shipment of military spare parts to Iran in late October 1980 with the express intent of undercutting Carter's leverage in the hostage negotiation talks and hurting his chances for re-election.
concordtom
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BearsWiin said:

Yogi Bear said:

sycasey said:

Yogi Bear said:

Unit2Sucks said:

This isn't her first rodeo. Again, I'm not accusing her of being a vile anti-semite but I think people are going out of their way to defend her when there is no reasonable basis to do so. All we know is she's made questionable comments in the past and present.

Here's an article from last month: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.vanityfair.com/news/2019/02/ilhan-omar-anti-semitic-remarks-aipac/amp
In the 1940's did we hate Germany, Germans, and/or Nazis?
I know how we treated the Japanese, which was pretty terribly
I've never really thought about this before, but I wonder why no one ever questioned why we put Japanese in internment camps, but not German-Americans?
Part of it has to do with the time that Germans had been in America. By WWII they'd largely assimilated, having come many decades earlier. German immigrants were treated with much more suspicion during WWI, when they hadn't been here for quite so long. Part of it has to do with racism, too, since German immigrants in WWI weren't put in internment camps the way Japanese immigrants were in WWII.


Not so fast, my friend,
Not so easily off the hook.

My coworker and friend told me about how his grandfather or great grandfather had come to Montana in the 1880's from Japan. They were in LA by Pearl Harbor, and sent to manzanar.
When they got back, a white family was in their house and they had to start over from scratch.
In the 80's, Reagan gave reparations of like $10,000?


I've looked thru my grandmother's yearbooks in early 30's Concord. There are Japanese kids there. I guess they got sent away as well.
I live in Placer county. Many orchard farmers here were Japanese. They went bye bye, too. Stories in town still shared today. Cause they came back.

These aren't just "unassimilated" foreigners.
They looked different and were easily recognized.
Bingo.

BearsWiin
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concordtom said:

BearsWiin said:

Yogi Bear said:

sycasey said:

Yogi Bear said:

Unit2Sucks said:

This isn't her first rodeo. Again, I'm not accusing her of being a vile anti-semite but I think people are going out of their way to defend her when there is no reasonable basis to do so. All we know is she's made questionable comments in the past and present.

Here's an article from last month: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.vanityfair.com/news/2019/02/ilhan-omar-anti-semitic-remarks-aipac/amp
In the 1940's did we hate Germany, Germans, and/or Nazis?
I know how we treated the Japanese, which was pretty terribly
I've never really thought about this before, but I wonder why no one ever questioned why we put Japanese in internment camps, but not German-Americans?
Part of it has to do with the time that Germans had been in America. By WWII they'd largely assimilated, having come many decades earlier. German immigrants were treated with much more suspicion during WWI, when they hadn't been here for quite so long. Part of it has to do with racism, too, since German immigrants in WWI weren't put in internment camps the way Japanese immigrants were in WWII.


Not so fast, my friend,
Not so easily off the hook.

My coworker and friend told me about how his grandfather or great grandfather had come to Montana in the 1880's from Japan. They were in LA by Pearl Harbor, and sent to manzanar.
When they got back, a white family was in their house and they had to start over from scratch.
In the 80's, Reagan gave reparations of like $10,000?


I've looked thru my grandmother's yearbooks in early 30's Concord. There are Japanese kids there. I guess they got sent away as well.
I live in Placer county. Many orchard farmers here were Japanese. They went bye bye, too. Stories in town still shared today. Cause they came back.

These aren't just "unassimilated" foreigners.
They looked different and were easily recognized.
Bingo.


You may have missed the part where I attributed internment to racism. I went back and bolded it so you could see it. Racism is the obvious and easy answer, but there were other factors. Life is complicated.

As for your anecdotal stories, cool. I have them in my family, too; my grandmother's first husband was interned after she went back to Ostmark (she was an American citizen in Nazi Germany during WWII, he was an American citizen in Stockton; guess who went to the camps). It's one of the more disgusting episodes in American history.

You may also have missed my previous posts about how immigration waves generally take three generations for immigrants to assimilate, and for other Americans to accept them.
bearister
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My Mom graduated Cal '42. She told the story of a young man she was very friendly with in one of her classes who was of Japanese descent. One day he just never showed up again. Interned.
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bearister
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President Trump somehow 'won' a golf tournament without even playing in it


https://www.google.com/amp/s/sports.yahoo.com/amphtml/president-trump-somehow-won-a-golf-tournament-without-even-playing-in-it-221538855.html
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concordtom
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BearsWiin said:

concordtom said:

BearsWiin said:

Yogi Bear said:

sycasey said:

Yogi Bear said:

Unit2Sucks said:

This isn't her first rodeo. Again, I'm not accusing her of being a vile anti-semite but I think people are going out of their way to defend her when there is no reasonable basis to do so. All we know is she's made questionable comments in the past and present.

Here's an article from last month: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.vanityfair.com/news/2019/02/ilhan-omar-anti-semitic-remarks-aipac/amp
In the 1940's did we hate Germany, Germans, and/or Nazis?
I know how we treated the Japanese, which was pretty terribly
I've never really thought about this before, but I wonder why no one ever questioned why we put Japanese in internment camps, but not German-Americans?
Part of it has to do with the time that Germans had been in America. By WWII they'd largely assimilated, having come many decades earlier. German immigrants were treated with much more suspicion during WWI, when they hadn't been here for quite so long. Part of it has to do with racism, too, since German immigrants in WWI weren't put in internment camps the way Japanese immigrants were in WWII.


Not so fast, my friend,
Not so easily off the hook.

My coworker and friend told me about how his grandfather or great grandfather had come to Montana in the 1880's from Japan. They were in LA by Pearl Harbor, and sent to manzanar.
When they got back, a white family was in their house and they had to start over from scratch.
In the 80's, Reagan gave reparations of like $10,000?


I've looked thru my grandmother's yearbooks in early 30's Concord. There are Japanese kids there. I guess they got sent away as well.
I live in Placer county. Many orchard farmers here were Japanese. They went bye bye, too. Stories in town still shared today. Cause they came back.

These aren't just "unassimilated" foreigners.
They looked different and were easily recognized.
Bingo.


You may have missed the part where I attributed internment to racism. I went back and bolded it so you could see it. Racism is the obvious and easy answer, but there were other factors. Life is complicated.

As for your anecdotal stories, cool. I have them in my family, too; my grandmother's first husband was interned after she went back to Ostmark (she was an American citizen in Nazi Germany during WWII, he was an American citizen in Stockton; guess who went to the camps). It's one of the more disgusting episodes in American history.

You may also have missed my previous posts about how immigration waves generally take three generations for immigrants to assimilate, and for other Americans to accept them.
Fair enough, and apologies. I jumped and hit reply before,I got to that. I bit as soon as I saw you comparing Germans to Japanese. It's FAR easier for a German to integrate than one with darker skin. All a Germn has to do is lose the accent. Meanwhile, my buddy still gets asked about his heritage. And his family has been here since the 1800's?? What a shame!

Tell me about your grandmother being in Germany during WW2. Why was that?
concordtom
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bearister said:

My Mom graduated Cal '42. She told the story of a young man she was very friendly with in one of her classes who was of Japanese descent. One day he just never showed up again. Interned.
Crazy, right?
bearister
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I don't ever think I am going to ever get another opportunity where this is even close to being related to a thread discussion:


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Send my credentials to the House of Detention
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BearsWiin
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concordtom said:

BearsWiin said:

concordtom said:

BearsWiin said:

Yogi Bear said:

sycasey said:

Yogi Bear said:

Unit2Sucks said:

This isn't her first rodeo. Again, I'm not accusing her of being a vile anti-semite but I think people are going out of their way to defend her when there is no reasonable basis to do so. All we know is she's made questionable comments in the past and present.

Here's an article from last month: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.vanityfair.com/news/2019/02/ilhan-omar-anti-semitic-remarks-aipac/amp
In the 1940's did we hate Germany, Germans, and/or Nazis?
I know how we treated the Japanese, which was pretty terribly
I've never really thought about this before, but I wonder why no one ever questioned why we put Japanese in internment camps, but not German-Americans?
Part of it has to do with the time that Germans had been in America. By WWII they'd largely assimilated, having come many decades earlier. German immigrants were treated with much more suspicion during WWI, when they hadn't been here for quite so long. Part of it has to do with racism, too, since German immigrants in WWI weren't put in internment camps the way Japanese immigrants were in WWII.


Not so fast, my friend,
Not so easily off the hook.

My coworker and friend told me about how his grandfather or great grandfather had come to Montana in the 1880's from Japan. They were in LA by Pearl Harbor, and sent to manzanar.
When they got back, a white family was in their house and they had to start over from scratch.
In the 80's, Reagan gave reparations of like $10,000?


I've looked thru my grandmother's yearbooks in early 30's Concord. There are Japanese kids there. I guess they got sent away as well.
I live in Placer county. Many orchard farmers here were Japanese. They went bye bye, too. Stories in town still shared today. Cause they came back.

These aren't just "unassimilated" foreigners.
They looked different and were easily recognized.
Bingo.


You may have missed the part where I attributed internment to racism. I went back and bolded it so you could see it. Racism is the obvious and easy answer, but there were other factors. Life is complicated.

As for your anecdotal stories, cool. I have them in my family, too; my grandmother's first husband was interned after she went back to Ostmark (she was an American citizen in Nazi Germany during WWII, he was an American citizen in Stockton; guess who went to the camps). It's one of the more disgusting episodes in American history.

You may also have missed my previous posts about how immigration waves generally take three generations for immigrants to assimilate, and for other Americans to accept them.
Fair enough, and apologies. I jumped and hit reply before,I got to that. I bit as soon as I saw you comparing Germans to Japanese. It's FAR easier for a German to integrate than one with darker skin. All a Germn has to do is lose the accent. Meanwhile, my buddy still gets asked about his heritage. And his family has been here since the 1800's?? What a shame!

Tell me about your grandmother being in Germany during WW2. Why was that?
She was born in Vienna 1910, child of WWI and influenza, sent to Switzerland after the war when the food distribution networks broke down and people couldn't get food in the cities (so they sent the children to farms so they wouldn't starve). Ended up spending several years in Switzerland being a governess to a rich family with many younger children. Back in Vienna by 1928, met and fell in love with a much older (early 40's) Japanese-American doctor who was doing some work/research at the university. They were married in Havana in 1930 as he was bringing her to her new home in Stockton CA.

She spends several years in Stockton, and along the way gets her citizenship. Relationship begins to fray as she matures and he gets older - she wants kids, he doesn't. 1937 rolls around, and she goes back to Europe for a modern dance tour (Berlin and environs) and to see family in Austria. Along the way she hooks up with the brother of one of her best friends from childhood who had recently committed suicide - they give each other consolation and comfort, and end up falling in love. She returns to Stockton after several months abroad, unhappy, in love with another man. Spends two years miserable, then decides at the beginning of 1940 that she needs to return to what is now Ostmark in the German Reich to be with this guy whom she loves. Takes a train to NY, gets on a steamer for Hamburg the week before the Phony War ends and Germany rolls over France. She lives with her hubby until he's conscripted into the Wehrmacht and is sent to France for occupation duty. Somewhere along the way he gets her preggo with my mother, who is born in Sept. 1941. US enters war, she's now an enemy alien in the Reich. Gestapo suspects her of being a spy, and she has to report in weekly to the local authorities. Meanwhile, in Stockton, the husband that she left is sent to an internment camp.

Hubby gets sent home from France, discharged because of bleeding ulcers. Doctor neighbor makes sure he's sick every time he has to go back before the medical board so he never has to serve again. She has another child as the Sovs are entering Vienna, and there's an incident in the maternity hospital when Red Cross nurses have to save her from being gangraped by Soviet soldiers. Somehow hubby isn't lined up against a wall and shot. A year later she starts divorce proceedings with her recently-freed husband in Stockton. He dies; officially heart failure, but the family rumor/secret is that he committed suicide from the shame of being served with divorce papers. She goes from wanting to divorce him to wanting to get his estate. She gets it, and after the horrible winter of 1948 when there's nothing to eat in Sov-occupied Austria, she convinces her hubby to come back to America with her. They use dead husband's money to get the family over to NY, then SF, then Klamath Falls, back to Vienna when it seemed too hard to make it in America, then back to Stockton by 1954. She speaks the language; he does not. He's a former Wehrmacht soldier in a country that had just fought the Germans, and gets roughed up regularly at different workplaces until he finds a good job as a master haberdasher/tailor in Stockton where he works for the next 35 years.

Everybody's family has a story or two like this in their relatively recent past; this happens to be my family's story. Big Events like war or famine or industrialization have a way of buffeting and sweeping people around in Zhivago-like ways where they have little if any control over their lives. For many in this country those Big Events are further in the past (since the Civil War the US has been relatively insulated from traumatic Big Events that happen elsewhere - that's one of the big draws for wanting to emigrate to America); for my mother's family, it was WWI and WWII. For the rest of her life my mother would not allow a cuckoo clock in the house, as the cuckoo sound was the alarm that Viennese radio used to warn the people that the Americans and British bombers were on their way, and that everybody should get to an air raid shelter. Sixteen years later, she was an American citizen herself.
Yogi Bear
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BearsWiin said:

concordtom said:


Fair enough, and apologies. I jumped and hit reply before,I got to that. I bit as soon as I saw you comparing Germans to Japanese. It's FAR easier for a German to integrate than one with darker skin. All a Germn has to do is lose the accent. Meanwhile, my buddy still gets asked about his heritage. And his family has been here since the 1800's?? What a shame!

Tell me about your grandmother being in Germany during WW2. Why was that?
She was born in Vienna 1910, child of WWI and influenza, sent to Switzerland after the war when the food distribution networks broke down and people couldn't get food in the cities (so they sent the children to farms so they wouldn't starve). Ended up spending several years in Switzerland being a governess to a rich family with many younger children. Back in Vienna by 1928, met and fell in love with a much older (early 40's)
Up to this point, I thought maybe your grandmother was Maria von Trapp

Quote:

Japanese-American doctor
Not Maria von Trapp

Quote:

who was doing some work/research at the university. They were married in Havana in 1930 as he was bringing her to her new home in Stockton CA.

She spends several years in Stockton, and along the way gets her citizenship. Relationship begins to fray as she matures and he gets older - she wants kids, he doesn't. 1937 rolls around, and she goes back to Europe for a modern dance tour (Berlin and environs) and to see family in Austria. Along the way she hooks up with the brother of one of her best friends from childhood who had recently committed suicide - they give each other consolation and comfort, and end up falling in love. She returns to Stockton after several months abroad, unhappy, in love with another man. Spends two years miserable, then decides at the beginning of 1940 that she needs to return to what is now Ostmark in the German Reich to be with this guy whom she loves. Takes a train to NY, gets on a steamer for Hamburg the week before the Phony War ends and Germany rolls over France. She lives with her hubby until he's conscripted into the Wehrmacht and is sent to France for occupation duty. Somewhere along the way he gets her preggo with my mother, who is born in Sept. 1941. US enters war, she's now an enemy alien in the Reich. Gestapo suspects her of being a spy, and she has to report in weekly to the local authorities. Meanwhile, in Stockton, the husband that she left is sent to an internment camp.

Hubby gets sent home from France, discharged because of bleeding ulcers. Doctor neighbor makes sure he's sick every time he has to go back before the medical board so he never has to serve again. She has another child as the Sovs are entering Vienna, and there's an incident in the maternity hospital when Red Cross nurses have to save her from being gangraped by Soviet soldiers. Somehow hubby isn't lined up against a wall and shot. A year later she starts divorce proceedings with her recently-freed husband in Stockton. He dies; officially heart failure, but the family rumor/secret is that he committed suicide from the shame of being served with divorce papers. She goes from wanting to divorce him to wanting to get his estate. She gets it, and after the horrible winter of 1948 when there's nothing to eat in Sov-occupied Austria, she convinces her hubby to come back to America with her. They use dead husband's money to get the family over to NY, then SF, then Klamath Falls, then back to Stockton by 1954. She speaks the language; he does not. He's a former Wehrmacht soldier in a country that had just fought the Germans, and gets roughed up regularly at different workplaces until he finds a good job as a master haberdasher/tailor in Stockton where he works for the next 35 years.
Wow. Quite a tale.
BearsWiin
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Coincidentally, I just saw my son's high school production of Sound of Music this weekend. "Edelweiss" never failed to make my grandfather cry, even though it was written by Americans ten years after he left his homeland for good. He always said that he'd rather live under a bridge in Vienna than in a mansion in America, so after he died we brought some of his ashes back to Vienna and scattered them under the Kennedybrucke in Hietzing, his old stomping grounds.
bearister
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What are the odds? Another gif I thought would never be remotely relevant to a thread discussion.



BearsWiin, that is a Hell of a story and well told.
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B.A. Bearacus
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bearister said:

BearsWiin, that is a Hell of a story and well told.
The above says it all, but seriously, thanks for sharing that story with us, BearsWiin.
blungld
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BearsWiin said:

She has another child as the Sovs are entering Vienna, and there's an incident in the maternity hospital when Red Cross nurses have to save her from being gangraped by Soviet soldiers. Somehow hubby isn't lined up against a wall and shot.
What a story.

My grandmother and mother were also in Vienna when the Soviets came in. She has scary stories about drunken Nazis knocking on the door and claiming the apartment for the night, sure they would get raped or shot. And then the same from drunken Soviets.

She eventually make it to American DP camp in Belgium and on to Ohio 7 years after the war.

"The Bear will not quilt, the Bear will not dye!"
concordtom
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bearister said:

I don't ever think I am going to ever get another opportunity where this is even close to being related to a thread discussion:



Shared that clip with my 15 year old 2 days ago!
concordtom
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Wow.
I'm glad I picked up on your line about your mom and bothered to ask. I figured there was something there, but not that!

Have you written it all down real good and long for family heritage sake?

That is sad about your grandfather. He lived his life here, but hated it?
Did he ever go back home? Did they go to see friends?
I have two families which are friends for 35 years. We grew up together, summers in Spain. They are from Vienna. I will have to share and see what they say. It will serve as the envoy to the questions I've always wanted to ask them. Been there once to visit them, and they us in DC.

Maybe one day, our great grandkids will all be talking about the era when the nation was enveloped with the Trump situation.

Is a simple heart attack too much to ask for?

PS, I've turned on doctor zhivago to fall asleep to, per your mention. We'll see how long I last.
Yogi Bear
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BearsWiin said:

Coincidentally, I just saw my son's high school production of Sound of Music this weekend. "Edelweiss" never failed to make my grandfather cry, even though it was written by Americans ten years after he left his homeland for good. He always said that he'd rather live under a bridge in Vienna than in a mansion in America, so after he died we brought some of his ashes back to Vienna and scattered them under the Kennedybrucke in Hietzing, his old stomping grounds.
I could never run for president because my 9th grade pictures in Nazi regalia from the play would doom me instantly
BearsWiin
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Yogi Bear said:

BearsWiin said:

Coincidentally, I just saw my son's high school production of Sound of Music this weekend. "Edelweiss" never failed to make my grandfather cry, even though it was written by Americans ten years after he left his homeland for good. He always said that he'd rather live under a bridge in Vienna than in a mansion in America, so after he died we brought some of his ashes back to Vienna and scattered them under the Kennedybrucke in Hietzing, his old stomping grounds.
I could never run for president because my 9th grade pictures in Nazi regalia from the play would doom me instantly
That, and last year's blackface party
Yogi Bear
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BearsWiin said:

Yogi Bear said:

BearsWiin said:

Coincidentally, I just saw my son's high school production of Sound of Music this weekend. "Edelweiss" never failed to make my grandfather cry, even though it was written by Americans ten years after he left his homeland for good. He always said that he'd rather live under a bridge in Vienna than in a mansion in America, so after he died we brought some of his ashes back to Vienna and scattered them under the Kennedybrucke in Hietzing, his old stomping grounds.
I could never run for president because my 9th grade pictures in Nazi regalia from the play would doom me instantly
That, and last year's blackface party
Shhhh
Unit2Sucks
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My grandmother was born in Vienna in 1914! She also had a colorful life before finally settling in America but her life was more of the traditional trying not to get killed by Nazis type.
concordtom
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BearsWiin said:

Yogi Bear said:

BearsWiin said:

Coincidentally, I just saw my son's high school production of Sound of Music this weekend. "Edelweiss" never failed to make my grandfather cry, even though it was written by Americans ten years after he left his homeland for good. He always said that he'd rather live under a bridge in Vienna than in a mansion in America, so after he died we brought some of his ashes back to Vienna and scattered them under the Kennedybrucke in Hietzing, his old stomping grounds.
I could never run for president because my 9th grade pictures in Nazi regalia from the play would doom me instantly
That, and last year's blackface party
Lol.
A lady in town had a big 40th party a few yrs back.
She is a huge Michael Jackson fan, and everyone had to wear something affiliated with "MJ", per the invitation. She had a huge Afro wig on. Others had red leather jackets, or solo gloves, or other less obvious connections. Being a basketball fan, I of course wore my Michael Jordan USA olympics jersey, dug up from a very old box. I thought that was pretty original, but someone else picked up the MJ angle, too.

Anyways, I wonder if an Afro in the future will be the backface of today. She'll be fired and rebuked for being a fan. And a pedo-fan at that!
concordtom
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Unit2Sucks said:

My grandmother was born in Vienna in 1914! She also had a colorful life before finally settling in America but her life was more of the traditional trying not to get killed by Nazis type.
What year did she come here?
Tell us stories. I like history.
bearister
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"The N.Y. Times' Annie Karni and Maggie Haberman get the jump on "Kushner Inc.," a book by investigative journalist Vicky Ward that's out a week from today:

She portrays Ms. Trump and Mr. Kushner as two children forged by their domineering fathers one overinvolved with his son, one disengaged from his daughter who have climbed to positions of power by disregarding protocol and skirting the rules when they can. And Ms. Ward tries to unravel the narrative that the two serve as stabilizing voices inside an otherwise chaotic White House, depicting them instead as Mr. Trump's chief enablers. ...
Ms. Trump and Mr. Kushner wanted to control who could travel on trips funded by the State Department, Ms. Ward wrote, citing a source at the department. Ms. Trump also often requested to travel on Air Force planes when it was not appropriate. When Rex W. Tillerson, the former secretary of state, would deny the requests, the couple would invite along a cabinet secretary, often Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, to get access to a plane." Axios
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Another Bear
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YMMV. Have a nice day. Enjoy the sunshine. Smoke two joints. That's what she said.
bearister
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Perhaps one of the reasons tRump was elected POTUS is because of the respect many have for his Hall of Fame skills in what has become America's National Pastime:

"The college admissions scandal popped at a time when Americans are barraged with accounts of corruption, greed and amoral behavior, AP's David Crary notes.

"Whether it's gaming the system to secure entry to an elite college, or circumventing laws and ethical norms to evade taxes, swindle customers or pocket illicit gains, unethical behavior has always been among America's national pastimes."
"Yet a strong case can be made that this moment is distinctive, with its constant stream of high-profile scandals entangling bankers, drug companies, sports organizations, government officials and others." Axios
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B.A. Bearacus
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Any chance the president uses the word Muslim today to be specific about the victims?
B.A. Bearacus
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The president's pitch perfect response to the gruesome massacre of a minority group at their place of worship:

concordtom
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Trump is so disgustingly lame!
bearister
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Another Bear
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Barack Obama, Mitch McConnell, Donald Trump, and a young Mexican boy were on a doomed plane, with only 3 parachutes.

"I'm the most talented man in the senate, I am the Majority Leader, I must be saved!" said McConnell as he grabbed a chute and jumped from the plane.

"I'm the smartest man in the world, tremendous talent. The world can't survive without me!" said Trump as he grabbed a chute and jumped.

Obama looked at the Mexican boy and said "Son I have lived a very good life, take the last chute and save yourself."

The boy replied "That's alright President Obama, the smartest guy in the world just jumped out of the plane with my back pack."
YMMV. Have a nice day. Enjoy the sunshine. Smoke two joints. That's what she said.
Unit2Sucks
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Normally that joke is funny but you have to account for the fact that Trump is too big a coward to actually jump. He would throw all the chutes out and demand Obama fix the problem. Then when Obama safely lands the plane Truml would take all the credit and blame the kid and Obama for the malfunction.
B.A. Bearacus
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